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SHOPPING - Branded Ads Showing on Generic Queries

Follower ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Follower ✭ ✭ ✭

Client has a sizable business in the automotive aftermarket - car covers.

 

We have a shopping campaign.  When someone enters a generic query in google.com like this - car covers - Google serves up a completely random (seemingly) automobile-branded ad.  Today, for instance a search on 'car cover" yielded an ad for Fisker Car Cover.  That is not a misprint.  Fisker is a car brand. 

 

As you can imagine, Fisker Car Cover wouldn't be our first choice for Ad in this circumstance.

 

Is there a way to make this better?

Regards, Doug
LinkedIn  
1 Expert replyverified_user

SHOPPING - Branded Ads Showing on Generic Queries

Badged Google Partner
# 2
Badged Google Partner

That's the nature of shopping queries. The more specific content you have in your shopping feed, and the more negatives you exclude, the more specific the query matching may be. Ad rank, bids, budget, etc., are all factors, along with other search intent signals based on aggregate user behavior that Google knows, but does not make available to advertisers. So if you were searching for Fisker cars, and now you are searching for car covers, you might see a brand specific shopping ad, even though you didn't specifically search for that brand. If you are seeing brand specific ads for generic products, then keep working on your descriptions, product groups and shopping campaign structure and optimization.

Tom

SHOPPING - Branded Ads Showing on Generic Queries

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

When entering a generic search term, a generic ad will appear. Which is pretty much how ads work.

 

If you do not want to show up for "car covers" than simply exclude this from your ad group or campaign.

 

To improve for generic search terms, is very hard as we don't know the clients advertising strategy. If you want brand awareness, than generic search terms are important. If it is for pure sales, than it is recommended to exclude the generic search terms from the ad group or campaign.

 

Hope it helps.

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SHOPPING - Branded Ads Showing on Generic Queries

Badged Google Partner
# 4
Badged Google Partner

Not when it comes to shopping campaigns.

 

Since KW's are not a possible targeting method for shopping campaigns, you really have to know what you are doing to generate a profitable ROAS. I assume the OP has the same issues as every experienced account manager - In that, there is only so much you can do on the front end to optimize all the variables involved in shopping campaigns. Maybe I completely misunderstood the OP's query. That happens, which is why discussion and ongoing communication is far more important than being "right" when it comes to teaching and helping others learn. 

 

Adgroups don't matter when it comes to shopping campaigns. Product groups, and product group(s) optimization does. That's one of the many differences between shopping campaigns (and other search campaign types) and conventional KW targeted search campaigns. It takes a lot more skill, experience, and effort - From multiple angles - To really optimize shopping campaigns. If it were that easy, anyone could drop ship product with no effort and make a gazillion dollars. Smiley Happy

 

I mean - If you sell car covers, excluding 'car covers' from your shopping campaign(s) is only going to kill your impression volume, and prevent your ads from showing to your most engaged, potentially profitable targeted users/customers... Again, maybe I'm not understanding the specific issue the OP is experiencing, but excluding the potentially most valuable search query is not going to help generate more sales through the shopping campaign(s). Smiley Happy

Tom

SHOPPING - Branded Ads Showing on Generic Queries

Top Contributor
# 5
Top Contributor

I did not say your answer was wrong, I simply provided additional info if he was seeing ads based on as an advertiser owner, explaining how to exclude his products from search terms he does not want to show up for.

 

From the write up, it does indeed point towards other ads. In this case as you have already explained, nothing can be done as it is an advertiser wanting to advertise for these search terms.

 

Hope this added info helps.

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SHOPPING - Branded Ads Showing on Generic Queries

Follower ✭ ✭ ✭
# 6
Follower ✭ ✭ ✭

My feeling is then, that an opportunity exists here to right the wrong, but there is perhaps a self-serving reason for google to keep an important piece of data to themselves. Their sandbox...

 

In the same way that Adwords will do all they can to penalize ad/KW pairings created by the account owner - that don't match user expectations - the same should apply when matching a generic query to a narrow specific result. It is not optimal. car covers showing a Fisker Car Cover is kind a joke, and statistically, it would only be less of a joke to serve up a Honda Car Covers Ad.

 

And IF the argument is that Google's secret sauce algorithms have scientifically discovered a higher likelihood that this generic query searcher owned a Honda and moreover would be more likely to convert...

 

then can I see that data? the missing data that shows Shopping search term matched to ad shown.

 

It seems oddly unavailable.

 

Regards, Doug
LinkedIn  

SHOPPING - Branded Ads Showing on Generic Queries

Badged Google Partner
# 7
Badged Google Partner

When have dozens, or thousands of specific products in your feed, and a user searches for the most generic term describing the product line, which specific product "should" show for that result? Maybe the end user is looking for car covers for a specific vehicle, maybe they are not. The only way for the Google machine to try and find out is to serve the most "relevant" options, according to the aggregate data gained from billions of searches.

 

If you have no brand search volume, odds are the end user is NOT specifically searching for your brand, when using the most generic term for the product. Higher volume brands, or higher volume specific makes/models are more likely to be "relevant" to that end user. 

 

Isolate your product groups, review the search terms, optimize your feed, and continue to optimize your structure for improved relevance. If generic top level product terms don't convert for your shopping campaign, then exclude those terms from the shopping campaign, and target those users with a "standard" search campaign. 

Tom