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RE: There is no one to speak to that is helpful ๐Ÿ˜ค๐Ÿ˜ค๐Ÿ˜ค

[ Edited ]
Visitor โœญ โœญ โœญ
# 1
Visitor โœญ โœญ โœญ

I keep on calling the 844-756-8495 customer service number and I am experiences helpful representatives from India but they can't seem to provide a solution. I feel like Google ignores all the small businesses. Unless your a big company you can't access the reps which can actually fix the issue.

 

My issue: the item group id is not aggregating the variations. I have spent hours on setting up the feed and for some reason my ads are showing up as XL or L but not one product which has size selection. HERE IS A LINK OF MY FEED - https://goo.gl/fsWenJ

 

A very frustrated advertiser, Allenxl-variation.PNG

2 Expert replyverified_user
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by MosheTLV (Top Contributor)
May

RE: There is no one to speak to that is helpful ๐Ÿ˜ค๐Ÿ˜ค๐Ÿ˜ค

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 7
Top Contributor

(a) global-trade-data, submitted by multiple merchants,

tends to be a stronger influence with respect to variants

and any possible aggregation by google -- in addition to

item_group_id, title, and variant-attribute, requirements,

if multiple variants are being submitted.

 

self-assigned global-trade-data, or global-trade-data that are
submitted by only one merchant, tend to be negative factors.

(b) submitting duplicate physical inventory, in the form of a

parent-product for example, is usually more of a hindrance

and tends to offset any positive influences -- in addition to

being a policy violation.

(1) if making changes are based on possible user-behavior, the best likely
course is to look for statistical data to support the assumption; for example,
look to the search-term and related conversion reports, to analyze which
queries are resulting in impressions, clicks, and conversions, and which
are failing to perform.

title changes with respect to variant-groups
should follow google's policies and guidelines;

google tends to publish guidelines that are

well aligned with their display algorithms

and google's user-behavior information --

which also tends to result in better overall

performance and more conversions.

(2) only physical inventory items are allowed to be submitted --
submitting representative offers, or mentioning other variations

that may or may not be currently available, in the merchant's

physical, on hand, inventory, is generally not allowed.

however, google does not require all variants be submitted;
submitting only one, single, physical inventory item from the
group, such as only the medium-size offer, is certainly an option
to consider -- but doing so may not be aligned with actual user
behavior over time, or may not positively influence google's

automated display decisions.

another consideration is to create a bidding strategy more aligned with
the business-goals -- for example, bidding higher on specific items to
display more often, or that tend to perform better over time, in addition
to, or instead of, any feed related changes.

 

View solution in original post

RE: There is no one to speak to that is helpful ๐Ÿ˜ค๐Ÿ˜ค๐Ÿ˜ค

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Regardless of size, be it small or large. There will be listings where Google will not show variants in a drop down or button within the a single merchant ad.

 

It depends on allot of factors and even if you have completed all the requirements, having the variants added is not always guaranteed. Google also does not state that these will be shown.

 

So here is a small check list

 

Make sure that all product identifiers are accurate such as brand, gtin and mpn

That the item group ID is the same for all variants.

That all variant attributes are added such as, gender, age group, size, size system, color, material etc...

That the titles are identical other than adding a different size, color, gender etc...

 

I'm going to mention again, even if you have everything perfect, Google may not show variants.

 

It also depends on the search term, search history, global customer behavior, algorithms etc...

 

Hope it helps.

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RE: There is no one to speak to that is helpful ๐Ÿ˜ค๐Ÿ˜ค๐Ÿ˜ค

Visitor โœญ โœญ โœญ
# 3
Visitor โœญ โœญ โœญ

I followed all of the requirements. Basically, all I do is submit attributes but I am not guaranteed that they will be show, correct?   

 

Is there any leverage I have to get my products the proper exposure. Right now I have only received 12 impressions in my first seven days?

RE: There is no one to speak to that is helpful ๐Ÿ˜ค๐Ÿ˜ค๐Ÿ˜ค

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

Correct.

 

Improve data feed quality

Increase bidding

Improve landing page experience

 

Hope it helps.

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Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please click on โ€˜Accept As Solutionโ€™

RE: There is no one to speak to that is helpful ๐Ÿ˜ค๐Ÿ˜ค๐Ÿ˜ค

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 5
Top Contributor

first, thank you for the link to the feed.

parent-products cannot be submitted to google; representative items,
or any duplicate physical inventory, are not allowed to be submitted.

generally, google cannot be forced to show a size-selection
within a shopping-ad compare-prices or similar display;
all shopping-ad display is purely at google's discretion --
about all that can be done is to follow all google's rules,
policies, and best-practices, to help influence the display.

for example, google may only display a size-menu,

or group products together with respect to variants,

or show a representative product with respect to the

variant-group, or similar display details, for certain

search-queries or in specific contexts.

for example, google may only display size-selections if valid global-trade-data
is being submitted, with respect to the manufacturer, only if other merchants
are submitting that exact same item-offer, from that exact same manufacturer --
generally, merchant-assigned global-trade-data are not allowed and otherwise,
typically, will not show such variant-options in a shopping-ad compare-prices
display, depending on the context.

 

that is, multiple merchants submitting the same item-offer may

help influence such display details; the same manufacturer's

global-trade-data, submitted by many multiple retail merchants,

tends to be a critical influence.

for example, if item_group_id was submitted, only after the feed
was already submitted, once, then google may simply take awhile
to incorporate the change and any related size-selections, or group

together variants, within specific shopping-ad contexts or displays.

 

Re: RE: There is no one to speak to that is helpful ๐Ÿ˜ค๐Ÿ˜ค๐Ÿ˜ค

Visitor โœญ โœญ โœญ
# 6
Visitor โœญ โœญ โœญ
I am trying to figure out if I should insert the size into the titles.
Here is my dilemma:

1) If Google is not aggregating my sizes, perhaps I should give them all
the same title as not to scare away those who are looking for a specific
size when a different size shows up. For example, Sue is searching for a
medium t shirt. If XL is in the title chances are she wont click on the ad.
However, if the title does not have a size, Sue might click on it and see
that other size options are available.

2) Dont submit size variations in the feed and just submit 1 ID per a
product which is listed as a parent product. For example, the product will
not have size submitted an have in the title: *BASEBALL TEE SHIRT IN SIZES
S, M, L, XL*
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by MosheTLV (Top Contributor)
May

RE: There is no one to speak to that is helpful ๐Ÿ˜ค๐Ÿ˜ค๐Ÿ˜ค

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 7
Top Contributor

(a) global-trade-data, submitted by multiple merchants,

tends to be a stronger influence with respect to variants

and any possible aggregation by google -- in addition to

item_group_id, title, and variant-attribute, requirements,

if multiple variants are being submitted.

 

self-assigned global-trade-data, or global-trade-data that are
submitted by only one merchant, tend to be negative factors.

(b) submitting duplicate physical inventory, in the form of a

parent-product for example, is usually more of a hindrance

and tends to offset any positive influences -- in addition to

being a policy violation.

(1) if making changes are based on possible user-behavior, the best likely
course is to look for statistical data to support the assumption; for example,
look to the search-term and related conversion reports, to analyze which
queries are resulting in impressions, clicks, and conversions, and which
are failing to perform.

title changes with respect to variant-groups
should follow google's policies and guidelines;

google tends to publish guidelines that are

well aligned with their display algorithms

and google's user-behavior information --

which also tends to result in better overall

performance and more conversions.

(2) only physical inventory items are allowed to be submitted --
submitting representative offers, or mentioning other variations

that may or may not be currently available, in the merchant's

physical, on hand, inventory, is generally not allowed.

however, google does not require all variants be submitted;
submitting only one, single, physical inventory item from the
group, such as only the medium-size offer, is certainly an option
to consider -- but doing so may not be aligned with actual user
behavior over time, or may not positively influence google's

automated display decisions.

another consideration is to create a bidding strategy more aligned with
the business-goals -- for example, bidding higher on specific items to
display more often, or that tend to perform better over time, in addition
to, or instead of, any feed related changes.