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How Shopping Ads Determine the Products Keywords

Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
# 1
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I wonder how Shopping Ads Campaign determine my products' related keywords. To create a shopping ads, you must link your AdWords to Google Merchant Center (GMC). Are those related keywords generated from product title & description? 

 

From the latest thing I know, the related keywords for products are generated from product title (150 characters max) for sure from AdWords Representative. However, I am kind of confused because GMC actually discourages a long title. 

 

Do I need to create a long title for the product? Are there any ways that can help Google to determine what related keywords for the products? 

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1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Joe R
November

Re: How Shopping Ads Determine the Products Keywords

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

(a) yes -- titles and descriptions are critical.

 

although shopping-ads do not use keywords per se --

for example, there is no such concept as a match-type.

 

the first several characters of a title may be used for display;

all data submitted for titles and descriptions may be indexed

for search -- assuming the data is high quality and meets all

google's policies.

 

title should name the physical item with key physical characteristics;

description should describe only the exact physical item being sold,

or the physical characteristics of that item-offer.


(b) outcomes in the auctions are mainly determined by the bid and quality;


(c) all data submitted may be used to help determine relevance and quality;


(d) each attribute google specifies in their feed requirements may be used
to assign quality, along with many other quality-related factors and signals,
such as click-through-rate, ratings, reviews, business details, landing-page
factors such as page-speed, ease of navigation, product display, price, etc.

 

title and description are both important factors in helping

to determine the search-term relevance with respect to a

physical inventory item, for a specific user.

as to title --

google may truncate a title depending on the context of the ad and display --
typically 15, 60, 70, 100, or 120 or so characters, depending on the context.

longer titles will always be truncated depending on these and other contexts.

since the title fluctuates there is no way to fit a title in all contexts --
simply be certain the first 15, 60, 70, or 100 characters accurately name
the exact physical item being sold -- include all important details that
define the specific physical product being sold and shipped.

importantly perhaps, all 150 characters will be indexed and used for searches --
to match the product to the user's search-terms; generally, display is extremely
important but do not sacrifice the potential to match a relevant search, for a
better display.

there may be a need to rearrange the titles,
so that the most unique and relevant name
is in the first 15, 60, or 70 or so characters.

inspecting search-query related reports -- against impressions, clicks, and
conversions -- may help to decide which of an item's physical characteristics
are best moved to the first 15-70 or so characters and which may do better
when moved to the last 80 characters, or into the description, both within
the submitted data (feed) and on the landing-page.

google constantly experiments with the format and display of shopping-ads;
there is no such static or exact number for title character limits to ensure
that a full title is displayed in all contexts -- google decides all format and
display of shopping-ads and those details may change at any time.

 

see also

https://support.google.com/merchants/answer/7052112

 

 

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Joe R
November

Re: How Shopping Ads Determine the Products Keywords

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

(a) yes -- titles and descriptions are critical.

 

although shopping-ads do not use keywords per se --

for example, there is no such concept as a match-type.

 

the first several characters of a title may be used for display;

all data submitted for titles and descriptions may be indexed

for search -- assuming the data is high quality and meets all

google's policies.

 

title should name the physical item with key physical characteristics;

description should describe only the exact physical item being sold,

or the physical characteristics of that item-offer.


(b) outcomes in the auctions are mainly determined by the bid and quality;


(c) all data submitted may be used to help determine relevance and quality;


(d) each attribute google specifies in their feed requirements may be used
to assign quality, along with many other quality-related factors and signals,
such as click-through-rate, ratings, reviews, business details, landing-page
factors such as page-speed, ease of navigation, product display, price, etc.

 

title and description are both important factors in helping

to determine the search-term relevance with respect to a

physical inventory item, for a specific user.

as to title --

google may truncate a title depending on the context of the ad and display --
typically 15, 60, 70, 100, or 120 or so characters, depending on the context.

longer titles will always be truncated depending on these and other contexts.

since the title fluctuates there is no way to fit a title in all contexts --
simply be certain the first 15, 60, 70, or 100 characters accurately name
the exact physical item being sold -- include all important details that
define the specific physical product being sold and shipped.

importantly perhaps, all 150 characters will be indexed and used for searches --
to match the product to the user's search-terms; generally, display is extremely
important but do not sacrifice the potential to match a relevant search, for a
better display.

there may be a need to rearrange the titles,
so that the most unique and relevant name
is in the first 15, 60, or 70 or so characters.

inspecting search-query related reports -- against impressions, clicks, and
conversions -- may help to decide which of an item's physical characteristics
are best moved to the first 15-70 or so characters and which may do better
when moved to the last 80 characters, or into the description, both within
the submitted data (feed) and on the landing-page.

google constantly experiments with the format and display of shopping-ads;
there is no such static or exact number for title character limits to ensure
that a full title is displayed in all contexts -- google decides all format and
display of shopping-ads and those details may change at any time.

 

see also

https://support.google.com/merchants/answer/7052112

 

 

How Shopping Ads Determine the Products Keywords

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

That's a great question.  I just started a new Product campaign, and the &@(#& thing was so general the actual people clicking on the ads were looking for something else.  With no way to control the keywords, product ads are a huge waste of money.  

How Shopping Ads Determine the Products Keywords

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

adding negative-words, more accurate targeting,

and adjusting titles and descriptions to be more

in align with the actual physical item, are some

of the ways to help control irrelevant results,

with respect to shopping-ads.

 

a best-practice is to review the search-terms and related reports,

and gather supportive data before, frequently during, and after

any such change.

 

however, as was indicated, some types of products,

or some business-goals, are simply not a good fit for

shopping-ads and may require, or perform better using,

different campaign-types or ad-formats for advertising.

 

see also

https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/6167176

https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/1722124

https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2567043