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Google Shopping Best Structure

[ Edited ]
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# 1
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Hi

I want to know what's peoples suggestions on best practice to Google Shopping Structure. I looked at different ways of doing this and there's a lot of contradictions out there, so I want to see other peoples views.

Bid on SKU level, some say this is best practice, some say it's not beneficial at all. is it or is it not?

One Campaign one Ad Group and subdivide within the Ad Group "All Products > Brand > Product Tyre > Item ID" vs Campaigns for all brands, Ad Groups for Product Tyre "All Products > Item ID" is there any solid data to say one works better then the other?

If I subdivide in the Ad Group ""All Products > Brand > Product Tyre > Item ID" does this make any differences to if I just used Item ID? Years ago in SEO the further away a page was from the root domain the less important the page was, is this the same here?

The way, depending on the client and the goal I structure an campaign is custom label 0 are the campaigns, Ad Groups are brand and subdivide down to SKU level "All Products > custom label 0 > Brand > Product Tyre > Item ID" but I have seen the same structure work very well without subdividing, just using item ID at the root all the item ideas are are related to the custom label and brand but without subdividing campaign = custom label 0, Ad Groups = brand and then the Item ID's

1 Expert replyverified_user

Google Shopping Best Structure

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# 2
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Hi Nathan

Prior to considering your structure you need to be aware of the limitation of AdWords structure:-

https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/6372658

 

In terms of bidding at an SKU level - absolutely i would always recommend this as some products and product variations will perform differently and you want to ensure that you have the flexibility to bid accordingly. 

 

Also be mindful that you will want to negative search terms and if you have SKUs in the same adgroup you may loss the ability to do this if their is conflict. So for example if you have a red hat and a blue hat in the same adgroup you are not able to negative out the "Red hat" when a user search for a blue hat - small example but you get the picture. 

 

In terms of splitting campaigns by product or brand -  depend on your catologue / product size price seasonality etc. 

 

Personally i tend to avoid custom labels as the "main" structure as they can be used as other indicators for reporting

 

Not sure i understand your SEO question above - this has no impact on SEO the user will land on the product page for shopping ads. Subdivide them is to ensure that you are able to view and manage the product groups/IDs easier. 

 

D

 

 

 

 

Google Shopping Best Structure

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

When in doubt experiment.

 

As asking on the forum will continue to give you different opinions. But I do recommend continuing to read different articles to create your own conclusions. Each merchant will have a different setup based on there targets, niche business etc...

 

You can even change campaign setup after your original one, as your historic ranking will be kept. However I recommend that you create a new campaign and pause the old one, so that you can keep the old data as reference.

 

I have setup allot of clients, some niche businesses I setup a basic category setup, while others, I setup a multi campaign with high and low priority to filter out specific keywords. It's pretty much depends on what the goals are.

 

Don't be afraid to make a mistake in setup, you can always rebuilt a new one as experience is key to success. And can only be accomplished by exercise.

 

The majority of cases I separate each ad group per brand or category. All product id's in one group is in most cases a very poorly managed setup. You need to think what you want to control, is it just bidding, or are you going the extra mile with search term management?

 

Two products in the same category can be completely different, how do you know what is going on when they are all in 1 ad group?

 

Hope it helps.

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Google Shopping Best Structure

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# 4
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Just to add further to Emmanuels comments - priority levels are a great tools to use as long as they are used correctly - we have "inherited" account with multiple campaigns and no regard to the products within them or the priority levels. Leading to almost a bidding war within the the same account along with not having a clear single point of reference  on a specific products performance. 

 

We are also using a structure were a single product ID is allocated to an ad group - giving us the ability to negative out and bid modify at very granular level - to be honest we have a tool to setup and manage the account structure (i.e. campaign adgroup setup) feed and bidding tech that support this structure. While it can be setup "manually" through ad words when you get into many 1k or 10k SKUs it becomes hard/costly to maintain and manage without the tech required

 

 

 

 

Google Shopping Best Structure

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# 5
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This is it, I keep testing and the new campaign which I recently set up is running very profitable compared to the old style I had running. It's not made a little difference, it's made a huge difference. Last 8 days compared to same period last year, revenue up 300% costs down 7% and ROAS up 323%. This years performance over Black Friday was down YOY, so I wanted to change the structure of the campaign and these were the results! 

 

My original structure was campaigns for gender and then broken out into sales and new line, example Men's Sales campaign, Ad Groups were brands. To get the right products in the right places I had to subdivide "All Products > custom label 0 > custom label 1 > Brand > Product Type > Item ID". The new structure was done by a campaign building tool and I structured the campaign sales and new line and missed out gender. Ad Groups structured by brand, so very much the same as before, the 2 differences were: I wasn't using custom label 0 and the Ad Groups don't subdivide so it was "All Products > Item ID" the products were all the right products related to the brand and the custom label 1 but didn't subdivide.