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Basic shopping campaign optimization questions

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# 1
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Over the past two years our Google Shopping costs have risen and our cost-per-conversion has doubled.

 

Based on suggestions from a Google Account Strategist, we enabled enhanced CPC in April as well as raising out budget. Our spend more than doubled and our conversion rate went from 2.03% to 1.37% compared to the same period last year. Our number of conversions went from 198 to 210, so no appreciable difference. 

 

So I'm pretty sad about that. I haven't been on this account for two years and am now back on it. I'm looking for suggestions for what I can do to analyze the account and improve the performance. Our cost-per-conversion is unsustainable. This is for a retail shopping site for mid-range-to-high-end home items. Right now we have one campaign with product groups broken out by brand. 

 

Is there something like a search query report for Shopping? I have a feeling we are showing for irrelevant queries, but I have no idea if that's true. I'm looking for any suggestions on how I should deal with this. Should I scrap the whole campaign and start over? 

 

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Accepted by topic author Lina89462367574
October

Basic shopping campaign optimization questions

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# 2
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Hi, Lina.

 

There certainly is a search query report for shopping as well. Click the keywords tab and under it and to the left you'll see a "Search terms" button.

 

And you're definitely right. CPC has risen a lot. Google lowered the entry barrier a lot for shopping campaigns, making it very easy for all merchants to create a feed and run a Shopping Campaign (kudos to them, but this has lead to a fierce competition). Nowadays setting up a website and exporting a feed and then running a Shopping Campaign is extremely easy and I'm pretty sure there are enough accounts running Shopping Campaigns only.

 

I for one have resorted to an OCD-type structure. I'm running three different campaign types (one for general terms, one for branded terms and one for product-related terms), with high, medium and low priority. And the ad groups structure is product type in the "rest" campaign, brands in the brands campaign and one product per ad group (1000+ ad groups) in the product oriented campaign, as outlined by Martin Roettgerding (look up his name and shopping campaigns and you'll see what I'm talking about).

 

But the only way of getting Shopping to run profitably was this: making sure that certain products don't show for certain queries and that bids are correlated with the search query importance (lower bids for less relevant terms, slightly higher for brand terms and high for product terms).

 

Hope it helps.

Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
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Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by topic author Lina89462367574
October

Basic shopping campaign optimization questions

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi, Lina.

 

There certainly is a search query report for shopping as well. Click the keywords tab and under it and to the left you'll see a "Search terms" button.

 

And you're definitely right. CPC has risen a lot. Google lowered the entry barrier a lot for shopping campaigns, making it very easy for all merchants to create a feed and run a Shopping Campaign (kudos to them, but this has lead to a fierce competition). Nowadays setting up a website and exporting a feed and then running a Shopping Campaign is extremely easy and I'm pretty sure there are enough accounts running Shopping Campaigns only.

 

I for one have resorted to an OCD-type structure. I'm running three different campaign types (one for general terms, one for branded terms and one for product-related terms), with high, medium and low priority. And the ad groups structure is product type in the "rest" campaign, brands in the brands campaign and one product per ad group (1000+ ad groups) in the product oriented campaign, as outlined by Martin Roettgerding (look up his name and shopping campaigns and you'll see what I'm talking about).

 

But the only way of getting Shopping to run profitably was this: making sure that certain products don't show for certain queries and that bids are correlated with the search query importance (lower bids for less relevant terms, slightly higher for brand terms and high for product terms).

 

Hope it helps.

Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’ Learn how here.

Basic shopping campaign optimization questions

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# 3
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Thanks, this is really helpful. I was very well versed on PLAs/Shopping but haven't used it in so long that I am feeling a bit lost.


For your three campaign types, how do you target general terms? We've been trying to target brand terms specifically because our products are expensive enough that general terms don't convert well enough to make it worth it. One product per ad group actually makes a lot of sense to me. We have several thousand products so the thought of setting that up gives me the shivers, but it seems like it might be the best option for monitoring the campaign.

Basic shopping campaign optimization questions

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# 4
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To any advertisers there are 3 fundamentals when it comes to Google Shopping.

 

1) Data feed

Make sure you have optimized and improved the data feed, along with making sure you have added all required and optional attributes

 

2) Adwords

Setting up an advanced multi campaign setup to allow you to bid differently depending on search term

Exclude low performing products

Exclude low performing keywords

Change bidding based on product, not overall campaign

 

3) Website

Improve and optimize the product landing page

Improve the ease of use of the checkout

 

If you plan to create a new campaign, never delete the old one. Keep it for data reference. Do note that enhanced CPC  will not work on the campaigns where the sales are not higher than 15 in the last 30 days. So take this into consideration when setting up a new campaign.

 

I recommend reading articles to get yourself educated on advertising if you are planning to do this by yourself.

 

Hope it helps

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Basic shopping campaign optimization questions

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# 5
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Hi there,

 

Shopping campaigns do have a search term report, and you can add negative keywords. Find it in the Keywords tab > Search Terms. 

 

Many advertisers have found that cost per conversion has risen compared to a year ago. Google Shopping has been a big success story and AdWords competition will typically be higher. You might also have competitors offering cheaper prices.

 

You should have a lot of data by now, so look at which products are providing a poor ROAS in the long-term and exclude them. For example, you might have products that have spent more in click costs that what their price is, without a sale. 

 

Make sure your product titles are informative and clearly describe the product to suit what a searcher is looking for.

 

If your products have GTINs (barcodes) make sure they are in the feed.

 

Pricing is very important. I have read that if you aren't above the median price of those listings in the shopping results for a search query, you won't be eligible to show in the shopping section of the main search results.

 

Check the Merchant Centre for products that may have been disapproved, and fix the problems for any products that might do well.

 

Compare sales of each product, in Shopping, with a year ago. If any have had a big decline, look at all the data and try to figure out why. For example, CPC might have doubled while CTR has halved. In that case, products of competitors may have become more appealing.

 

 

Basic shopping campaign optimization questions

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor

The structure is as follows (using Martin's example with running shoes):

 

- search queries such as "running shoes" go to the "Rest" Campaign. This one has the highest priority but the lowest bids. Brand terms such as Asics and Nike and also product related terms such as "Wave Rider 20" (a Mizuno model) are excluded from this campaign.

- "Mizuno running shoes" go to the "Brands" campaign. This one has medium priority and medium bids. Search queries that contain "mizuno" will skip the rest campaign and land here, in a "Mizuno" ad group (one brand per ad group).

- Finally, "mizuno wave rider 20", or "wave rider 20" search terms skip both the Rest and the Brands campaign, because they contain the "wave rider 20" product identifier, and land into the "Products" campaign. Here are the highest bids and a one ad group per product structure.

 

So by using campaign priority and negative keywords we could steer search query categories into the right campaigns.

Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
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Basic shopping campaign optimization questions

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# 7
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@Emmanuel F, for the sake of (politically) correctness, Smiley Happy , I think you should use the phrase "excluding low performing search queries (through negative keywords" in the text above, instead of "low performing keywords".

Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
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Basic shopping campaign optimization questions

[ Edited ]
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# 8
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@AdWiser why do you use one product per ad group. Can't you split up the product group per item? Or do you use negative keywords on an adgroup level?

Basic shopping campaign optimization questions

[ Edited ]
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# 9
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Yes on the second question. There is often more than one product that gets triggered for a certain search query and I want to be able to block some of them if need be.

Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’ Learn how here.

Basic shopping campaign optimization questions

[ Edited ]
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# 10
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@AdWiser, General keywords like "running shoes" have done really poorly for us in AdWords, with cost-per-conversions higher than the price of the order in many cases. We do really well on brand terms. For that reason I've been using the broad match modifier in all of our AdWords campaigns, for example, "+brand glassware." In AdWords, if I have a general Ad Group for "glassware" with low bids and then I have a Brand Ad Group for "BrandX glassware" with higher bids, unless I am using the broad match modified general terms like "glassware" will be shown through the Brand Ad Group anyway. 

 

Does it work like that for shopping as well? Ie. if I have a Campaign for general terms with low bids, and someone searches for that general term, won't they just be shown the ad from one of the other campaigns? Google's propensity to expand the match as far as possible has always been a money waster for us. Just looking at our search terms report is really disappointing. We're showing on terms like "broom and dustpan" which makes perfect sense because we sell a broom and dustpan, but ours are handmade in Sweden and cost $130. So not what most people are looking for when they search for "broom and dustpan."

 

Is the idea that I should be using tens of thousands of negative keywords in the brand/product campaigns? 

 

Edit to add: I'm reading about Martin's plan and if I'm understanding it correctly, it involves using lots of negatives to direct traffic to the correct campaign.