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Discover how to select who is eligible to be in your experiment, and when they’re served experiment variations.
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"Stickiness" of a test in Optimize?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Does anyone know how stickiness works for targeting in Optimize? For example, we would like to be able to run a test for a soft launch where some logged-in users will see a link to a page, whereas others won't. We want for a user who sees the control to continue seeing the control and the users who see the test version to continue seeing the test version. How can we ensure that this will happen?

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Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by topic author Claire M
June

"Stickiness" of a test in Optimize?

Google Employee
# 5
Google Employee

This is the default behavior of Google Optimize, so you don't need to do anything.

 

Stickiness is implemented by Google Optimize using a cookie (_gaexp cookie that you may inspect in chrome dev tools) that expires after 90 days, which is the maximum time that an experiment will run.

 

Of course your logged-on users may be assigned to a different variation, when they use a different device (stickiness is per device).

 

Another thing to note is that the experiment/variation is associated with the user session even on pages where the experiment does not run.

 

For example you may make an experiment on your "home" page where you add a link to your special "target" page which you have identified as your Google Analytics goal (set up as a goal in GA admin).

 

You may use that goal as your experiment objective (even though this experiment runs on your "home" and not on "target"). The goal conversion will be assigned to your experiment/variation since this will be part of the same user session.

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"Stickiness" of a test in Optimize?

Follower ✭ ✭ ✭
# 2
Follower ✭ ✭ ✭

It'd be great to hear what Google would recommend in this situation. Assuming the link lands on a page that can also be accessed without clicking the link, your success metric would be the number of visitors who hit the destination URL of the link. In your control, show the link (assuming that's where the link can be seen). In the variant, select the link and remove it, or use JavaScript and/or CSS to hide it.

"Stickiness" of a test in Optimize?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Yep that's what I'm planning on doing. My main concern is ensuring that those who see the variant where this is NO link to the page, always see no link during the duration of the test.

"Stickiness" of a test in Optimize?

Follower ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Follower ✭ ✭ ✭

The best way to guarantee this would be to set a cookie for those who should see no link. The logic for your developer would be that if a person has such a cookie, they should not see the link for the duration of the test (they can check the _gaexp cookie to first check if a visitor is part of the experiment). Based on the index of the _gaexp cookie, the cookie for the visitors who do not see the link can be set. I would recommend setting that cookie via Google Tag Manager along with the check and change.

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Claire M
June

"Stickiness" of a test in Optimize?

Google Employee
# 5
Google Employee

This is the default behavior of Google Optimize, so you don't need to do anything.

 

Stickiness is implemented by Google Optimize using a cookie (_gaexp cookie that you may inspect in chrome dev tools) that expires after 90 days, which is the maximum time that an experiment will run.

 

Of course your logged-on users may be assigned to a different variation, when they use a different device (stickiness is per device).

 

Another thing to note is that the experiment/variation is associated with the user session even on pages where the experiment does not run.

 

For example you may make an experiment on your "home" page where you add a link to your special "target" page which you have identified as your Google Analytics goal (set up as a goal in GA admin).

 

You may use that goal as your experiment objective (even though this experiment runs on your "home" and not on "target"). The goal conversion will be assigned to your experiment/variation since this will be part of the same user session.