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Setting up A/B tests for unclear USPs (ex. hidden freight cost) to measure abandon checkout rate

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi guys

 

We have free delivery above 1000 NOK in our webshop. Due to high average order value, most of our customers end up with free delivery in most cases. We have unique selling points on product pages, menus etc. but we like to test out to only say "Free Delivery" vs "Free Delivery above 1000 NOK". Some say rule#1 in CRO is to not hide cost, but why not give it a try...

 

I want to measure overall conversion rate, but primary goal is to see what will happen with the abandon checkout rate were the freight cost for those below 1000 NOK will be presented.

 

How to do this in Optimize? How can I set up a goal or other for this objective? How to measure?

 

Thanks in advance

Christian Evensen

Fjellsport.no

1 Expert replyverified_user
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

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Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by topic author Christian E
May 2017

Setting up A/B tests for unclear USPs (ex. hidden freight cost) to measure abandon checkout rate

Google Employee
# 4
Google Employee

Hi

 

I believe that Google Analytics goals are quite powerful and should allow you to measure things similar to what you mention. You are right, you may need either events or perhaps e-commerce tracking https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/1009612?hl=en to receive the correct signals from your page and be able to setup your GA goals correctly.

 

In case you haven't use GA goals before, you can set them up from the Admin page on analytics.google.com

 

Once you have all goals (i.e. perhaps  1. total conversion rate 2. conversion rate for customers for transaction > 1000 and 3. conversion rate for customers for transaction < 1000), you may use them in Google Optimize - pick one of them as the primary objective and the others as secondary objectives for your experiment.

 

The Optimize experiment report, will give you the effect of your experiment for all and then you may decide what is best.

 

You may also see your Optimize experiment data inside Google Analytics and use its powerful reporting and segmentation features to perhaps get a better insight.

View solution in original post

Setting up A/B tests for unclear USPs (ex. hidden freight cost) to measure abandon checkout rate

Google Employee
# 2
Google Employee

Hi

 

Do you have a Google Analytics goal for conversion rate? (see https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/1012040?hl=en)

 

If you have such a goal setup in GA, you could just use it as your objective in the Optimize experiment.

 

Then (if I got your idea right), you could include the freight cost for those below 1000 NOK in your page, and them "remove it" for your variation.

 

This should compare how users compare for "conversion" when they see the freight cost vs not seeing it.

 

Setting up A/B tests for unclear USPs (ex. hidden freight cost) to measure abandon checkout rate

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi Dimitris

 

Thanks for your reply. My test objective is 1. see effect in ecommerce conversion rate and 2. see effect on the abandoned cart rate.

 

Hypothesis is that 1. my ecommerce conversion rate will increase if I remove the freight limit in the USP copy, or 2. will the the abandoned checkout increase since I am "hiding" the freight limit in the the USP copy and "surprise" the customer with it on the check out process. Most of them will be above freight limit anyway, but what will the rest of them do? Leave?

 

How to measure 2.? Do I need to install an custom and triggered event in GTM for this?

 

ThanksSmiley Happy 

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Christian E
May 2017

Setting up A/B tests for unclear USPs (ex. hidden freight cost) to measure abandon checkout rate

Google Employee
# 4
Google Employee

Hi

 

I believe that Google Analytics goals are quite powerful and should allow you to measure things similar to what you mention. You are right, you may need either events or perhaps e-commerce tracking https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/1009612?hl=en to receive the correct signals from your page and be able to setup your GA goals correctly.

 

In case you haven't use GA goals before, you can set them up from the Admin page on analytics.google.com

 

Once you have all goals (i.e. perhaps  1. total conversion rate 2. conversion rate for customers for transaction > 1000 and 3. conversion rate for customers for transaction < 1000), you may use them in Google Optimize - pick one of them as the primary objective and the others as secondary objectives for your experiment.

 

The Optimize experiment report, will give you the effect of your experiment for all and then you may decide what is best.

 

You may also see your Optimize experiment data inside Google Analytics and use its powerful reporting and segmentation features to perhaps get a better insight.