Analytics
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If someone clicked on an ad yesterday and completed transaction tomorrow..

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hey guys, I've got a question on GA revenue tracking:

 

If someone clicked on an ad referred by source_A yesterday, left the shopping cart  window opened, and starts the checkout on the same webpage after 2 days... would GA still attribute that revenue to source_A? What would actually happen with revenue attribution and why?

 

Thank you!

Re: If someone clicked on an ad yesterday and completed transaction tomorrow..

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 2
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
Google Analytics will base it on the "last touch" or "last interaction".

If they came in via source_A yesterday and then came back via source_B it would be attribute to source_B - last touch wins.

This article may help you in understanding the attribution models available in Google Analytics

https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/1191209

Ali

Re: If someone clicked on an ad yesterday and completed transaction tomorrow..

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 3
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆

I think some clarification needs to be added - Google Analytics assigns conversions to last "non-direct" touch/interaction. For example:

 

Let's assume that user always use the same browser and doesn't erase cookies. When he enters your site from "source A" one day, leaves and comes back day after by entering your site directly (for example typing address or entering from bookmark) then conversion would be assigned to "source A". It's because on first vist Google Analytics will create cookie that among other things will contain source of visit.
When user comes second time Google Analytics will check if that cookie is present and what source of visit was written previously in it. Then it will assign conversion source in one of the following ways:

 

1st scenario
First visit: Direct,
Second visit: Direct
Source of conversion: Direct

 

2nd scenario
First visit: Non-direct,
Second visit: Direct
Source of conversion: Non-direct

 

3rd scenario
First visit: Direct,
Second visit: Non-direct
Source of conversion: Non-direct

 

4th scenario
First visit: Non-direct,
Second visit: Non-direct
Source of conversion: Non-direct

 

To put it simply - Google Analytics will always choose last non-direct source of conversion if it can find it in _ga cookie stored in user's browser. If it won't find any it will assign conversion to current source of conversion.

 

Why it is important to assume that user uses the same browser? It's because Google Analytics cannot measure real users - in a very simplistic way we can tell that it only measures particular browsers that contain (or not) _ga cookies. For example: when you enter site from Chrome then close it and enter from Firefox you'd be counted as 2 different users.

Re: If someone clicked on an ad yesterday and completed transaction tomorrow..

[ Edited ]
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Thanks Andrzej!

You mentioned:
"Let's assume that user always use the same browser and doesn't erase cookies. When he enters your site from "source A" one day, leaves and comes back day after by entering your site directly (for example typing address or entering from bookmark) then conversion would be assigned to "source A". It's because on first vist Google Analytics will create cookie that among other things will contain source of visit."

My follow-up question:
In this case, would GA attribute the transaction revenue to a specific session from source_A? Or would it just attribute to sources_A? I was wondering if it matters that first session of the user expired.

Re: If someone clicked on an ad yesterday and completed transaction tomorrow..

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 5
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
GA would attribute this conversion to last non direct source exactly as you
see in above scenarios. If your user entered from for example organic and
later made several purchases coming each time from direct, conversions
would be assigned to organic for as long as:

1. _ga cookie is deleted by user OR
2. _ga cookie expires (60 days for GA cookies) OR
3. user comes from different non-direct source

Expiring session doesn't change anything because if it does expire GA would
start another session with the same source.

Hope that I explained it well Smiley Happy

If have any other questions please let me know. I'd be glad to help.