Analytics
2K members online now
Understand information in your reports and troubleshoot reporting issues such as self-referrals, (not set) data, and inaccurate information
 
Guide Me
star_border
Reply

Rise in bounce rate by network domains

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hello,

I've had a sharp spike in my bounce rate (over 1,000% increase). I was able to pinpoint the day the increase occurred and saw that within 3 hours the bounce rate increased from 0.44% - 73.47% and then plateaued. Admittedly, the bounce rate has been quite low. When the site was redesigned and launched a few months ago, the bounce rate hovered around 5% - 6%, which I know is unusually low for any website. But then, on a particular, the bounce rate increased from 0.44% - 73.47% in a matter of 3 hours and then plateaued. Since then, the bounce rate has been holding steady at around 73%.

 

I noticed that on the day the bounce rate spiked the number of network domains increased as well. The day before the spike, there were 15 network domains hitting the site. The day the bounce rate spiked, the number of network domains hitting the site increased to 384. Not only did the bounce rate for each network domain increase, the "not set" and "unknown.unknown" network domains recorded over 1,000 bounces combined in a matter of hours.

 

Anyone have any idea what's going on here? Why did the number of network domains increase dramatically? And why such a sharp increase in bounce rate in a matter of hours?

 

Any insight is appreciated.

Thanks.

1 Expert replyverified_user

Rise in bounce rate by network domains

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

First of all, you should investigate why you had such a low bounce rate -- it the analytics tracking code being trigger twice on every page?

 

Next, the sudden spike could simply be all the language spam or another bot that hit everyone over the past week or two - since it is fake traffic, it would not trigger a duplicate code on your site, so the bounce rate would climb quickly.

 

Look at other dimensions - other reports -- to figure out what happened. Then, fix your low bounce rate; that is not right.

Mike Sullivan, Google Analytics Top Contributor
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’ Learn how here.

Rise in bounce rate by network domains

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Thank you for your insight. Much appreciated. I checked the site, and the Google Analytics tracking code is not being duplicated on pages and no filters have been set up that would impact reporting. The spike in bounce rate occurred on 10/13/16, so I don't think it's in relation to the language spam or bot spam that hit everyone in the past couple weeks as you suggested. The bounce rate has plateaued since 10/13/16, so the bounce rate seems to be more "normal" in that, it fluctuates between 60% and 70% rather than 5%, which was extremely low. What other dimensions or reports do you suggest I look at? Thanks.

Rise in bounce rate by network domains

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

Well, stop focusing on bounce rate, and ignore all percentages. Look at the actual visit/session counts to your site by Source / Medium over time - that would help you identify what has changed by source. If all sources were basically flat for sessions, but the bounce rate changed across all of them, then the problem is your web site -- something changed in the tracking code.  

 

Maybe you had duplication and you eliminated it on 10/13/16 (so now it works properly). You can confirm this by looking at the Behavior reports -- the number of pageviews would have dropped by about half on that date.

 

If your sessions volume has changed significantly, then look at what sources went up. Are they real?

Mike Sullivan, Google Analytics Top Contributor
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’ Learn how here.