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High Bounce Rate on a screen resolution

[ Edited ]
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I'm doing some work for a client and we've noticed an extremely high bounce rate for one screen resolution - 1440 x 900

 

I've changed the resolution of my own display to that particular resolution and can't see an issue with anything on any of the pages.  I'm including a breakdown of the operating systems and browsers for the 1440 x 900 resolution.

 

Is there any way of me identifying the issue, or at least being able to see what's going on?

 

If anyone could provide any help I'd be hugely grateful.

 

1440x900.PNG

 

 

 

 

High Bounce Rate on a screen resolution

Explorer ✭ ☆ ☆
# 2
Explorer ✭ ☆ ☆

Hi Chris,

 

I would edit that custom report and switch out Pageviews for Entrances - Bounce Rate is calculated based off of Entrances, not Pageviews. 

 

If you're still seeing a high sample size of Entrances for a particular combination, such as Windows Chrome, I would create a segment that specifies SR: 1440x900, OS: Windows, and Browser: Chrome and look at the basic audience/acquisition reports. 

 

Are you seeing any strange language codes such as "c" or "secret.google" - if those, those usually indicate bot traffic. 

Check source / medium to see where these users came from.  

Check landing pages report to see the exact pages those users bounced from - do these differ from average site visitors?

 

Best,

Mike

High Bounce Rate on a screen resolution

[ Edited ]
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi Mike, thanks for your response.

 

I know it's not bots as this report is with my spam filters on, excluding the ghosts and crawlers.

 

I'll try what you've suggested with the entrances and the audience/acquisition reports.

Re: High Bounce Rate on a screen resolution

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi Mike,

 

I set up the new segment as you suggested and it has at least pinpointed the cause of the problem, all of that traffic is coming from somewhere called Ashburn in the USA.

 

I imagine it's spam, but the traffic also seems to be coming through from the same location via our twitter links as well

 

I'm unsure why it's not getting caught in my filters or segments.  I know the report I'm attaching shows all data, but Ashburn is still there after I've applied my segment to remove the spam.  Any clues as to how to get rid of it?

 

Thanks again for your for your help.1440 x 900 - Ashburn.PNG

High Bounce Rate on a screen resolution

[ Edited ]
Explorer ✭ ☆ ☆
# 5
Explorer ✭ ☆ ☆

Hi Chris,

 

Ashburn, VA is known for bot traffic as that's where Amazon's cloud data center (AWS) is located. The twitter traffic is likely just users in that area who happen to browse your site - I wouldn't do anything to remove those. It's not uncommon to get 100% bounce rate from a handful of sessions. 

 

Add source/medium = (direct)/(none) and City = Ashburn to your segment and pull up the language code report. I had something similar on my site and found that all of the bot traffic from Ashburn used language code "c." If it's the same for your case, you can create your own view filter to remove language code "c." The filter uses regex so make sure you use ^c$ - otherwise you'll remove all language codes containing "c."

 

Best,

Mike

High Bounce Rate on a screen resolution

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 6
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

This is what I don't understand, all the visits are in en-us, and my spam filters already filter out anything from language 'c' anyway.

 

I think it's too big a coincidence that twitter users in that location are visiting our site, as we're UK based, we don't have many visitors to the site and don't get much US traffic in the first place, let alone from the same town that all the spam is coming from.

 

Would the best thing to be to just filter out all the traffic from Ashburn?

 

 

High Bounce Rate on a screen resolution

Explorer ✭ ☆ ☆
# 7
Explorer ✭ ☆ ☆

That might be your best bet, as long as you're fine with missing out on potentially "real" traffic from Ashburn. The first line from your last screenshot definitely indicates bot traffic (100% new sessions, 0 session duration, 1 page/session). 

High Bounce Rate on a screen resolution

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 8
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Thanks Mike.

 

I actually went and excluded traffic from the domain name 'amazonaws.com', is that a more worthwhile route?  I just don't want to exclude any real traffic.

 

I've got some more spam visits from msn.com in Boston that have slipped through my spam filters using the same information; 'direct', 'en-us' with a legitimate hostname - baseconnectionstelemarketing.com, so was wondering whether I could do the same with 'msn.com'?

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Chris F
December 2016

High Bounce Rate on a screen resolution

Explorer ✭ ☆ ☆
# 9
Explorer ✭ ☆ ☆

I wouldn't exclude full network domains such as amazonaws.com - my site at least has a small but decent size chunk of "real" traffic with amazonaws.com as the network domain. Depending on your traffic and if sampling is an issue, I might consider not using filters (since they are limited to a single dimension) and using a segment to exclude sessions from Ashburn, direct, and amazonaws.com. Not very practical if you use other segments for reporting though. 

High Bounce Rate on a screen resolution

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 10
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

We don't get much traffic at all, so if in a few years, we start getting tens of thousands of visits a month, I'll probably re-assess but for now I'll just do that.

 

Thanks for all your help.

 

Chris