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Learn to identify referral spam traffic, as well as best practices to reduce referral spam in your Google Analytics account
 
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Is my website under attack?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hello all.

 

I am new to running a website and interpreting the data therefrom. I am using Google Analytics to monitor traffic and user behavior.

 

The website has been up for five days. Google Analytics has twice registered a large (large for my website) influx of traffic from Boston all of which has a high bounce rate. For instance, today I had about 100 unique users visitors come to my website. 32 of those were from Boston, all coming at about 9 am, with a 94% bounce rate among those users. The rest of my traffic is spread throughout the day with about a 50% bounce rate.

 

The second day the site was up, I registered about 240 unique users with 110 being from Boston, about 100 being from "city not set," but with a 90% or higher bounce rate.

 

Are these website crawls from search engines are something nefarious?

 

Here is the website:

www.millrightcnc.com

 

Thank you.

 

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Derek R
July 2016

Re: Is my website under attack?

[ Edited ]
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭

I don't recommend to click on those links in your Google Analytics account that seem to be weird or which don't have a proper hostname. You can read more about the different bots here: https://www.incapsula.com/blog/bot-traffic-report-2014.html

Hopefully, your website is protected. You should contact your website developer in order to ask more information about the level of the security.

 

I will list out the free tools that you can use scan your website for security vulnerabilities and malware:

I hope above list helps you to perform security scanning against your website.

 

Here's the great overview that Alex Moore has written:

 

Evil smart bots: bots that go crawling for content they can scrape and use for their own nefarious gain. Some bots crawl web pages just to wreak havoc on web servers and increase costs for site owners.

 

Good search engine bots, generally speaking, will be excluded from Google Analytics automatically. They also follow directives that are outlined in a website’s robots.txt file, or in its meta tags, and crawl only the pages they’re supposed to. Good bots intentionally prevent requests from being sent to Google Analytics’ servers.

 

It’s the evil ones, the ones that break all the rules, and the ones that process JavaScript that we’re most concerned about. These “bad bots” account for a staggering 27% of all web traffic, at least, according to the same Incapsula study.

 

Taavi

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Re: Is my website under attack?

Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 2
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi Derek,

 

You can find the answer here: https://www.en.advertisercommunity.com/t5/Referral-Spam-Traffic/Greetings/m-p/590889#M842

 

It seems to me that you have a similar problem. Smiley Happy

 


If you got the answer, let me know with a star. ⭐️

Taavi

 

Re: Is my website under attack?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Thank you Taavi. It looks like it has to be a bot or bots. I will read up on the links that are on that answer that you provided some more. It looks like it will take a lot of study to figure that one out. I got the point about not clicking the links to bogus traffic, but I am also curious if this indicates anything malicious. I really don't know anything about being a webmaster. The website is hosted by a very reputable hosting company. Are they going to keep me safe from the website being taken down by one of these bots or malicious code being inserted?

Thanks.
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Derek R
July 2016

Re: Is my website under attack?

[ Edited ]
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭

I don't recommend to click on those links in your Google Analytics account that seem to be weird or which don't have a proper hostname. You can read more about the different bots here: https://www.incapsula.com/blog/bot-traffic-report-2014.html

Hopefully, your website is protected. You should contact your website developer in order to ask more information about the level of the security.

 

I will list out the free tools that you can use scan your website for security vulnerabilities and malware:

I hope above list helps you to perform security scanning against your website.

 

Here's the great overview that Alex Moore has written:

 

Evil smart bots: bots that go crawling for content they can scrape and use for their own nefarious gain. Some bots crawl web pages just to wreak havoc on web servers and increase costs for site owners.

 

Good search engine bots, generally speaking, will be excluded from Google Analytics automatically. They also follow directives that are outlined in a website’s robots.txt file, or in its meta tags, and crawl only the pages they’re supposed to. Good bots intentionally prevent requests from being sent to Google Analytics’ servers.

 

It’s the evil ones, the ones that break all the rules, and the ones that process JavaScript that we’re most concerned about. These “bad bots” account for a staggering 27% of all web traffic, at least, according to the same Incapsula study.

 

Taavi