Analytics
2.6K members online now
2.6K members online now
Ask questions about filter set-up and issues with using filters in Google Analytics reports
 
Guide Me
star_border
Reply

Best way to track optimized pages?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I am trying to isolate and track data for just a set of pages for a site, not the entire site. I'd like to find data for 1800 pages before they were optimized, after they were optimized and how they are performing over time. Also, they are being optimized on a rolling basis so that adds another dimension.

 

So far, I have tried using a REGEX filter on the main audience session, but it doesn't seem to be isolating the pages, the search numbers do not change from all traffic to this custom session. I've also tried running a custom report using REGEX matches but I continuously get an error message, as I believe I have hit a REGEX limit around 90,000 characters, if this exists. I can do smaller batches, such as monthly but there seems to be a variable I can't quantify and don't understand because the numbers simply don't make sense and are averaging out in strange ways. 

 

I don't fully understand how REGEX works but if for example one of the urls optimized is macys.com/store/containers/ does that mean that every url with macys.com/store/containers/ will be included in the report? Because we definitely do not want that. (Macys is just an example, not my client.)

 

 

Basically we have been optimizing pages in batches monthly and are having a hard time finding the correct data to show the pages performance prior to optimizations versus after. Other than pulling these numbers one at a time, but the project consists of 1800 pages, and pulling them one at a time cannot be the only way. 

 

There has to be some sort of way to find the valuable data that can prove or disprove our work. I've spent months tinkering and trying to figure it out to no avail.

 

I need help. 

 

Help!

 

Can I call Google?

Best way to track optimized pages?

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 2
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆

Hi @Megan D

 

First of all, it's not feasible to do that kind of comparison on different date ranges. Ideally, those optimizations should be A/B-tested in one date range where you continously monitor performance in a control group vs. a test group. The control group is presented with the original page, and the test group is presented with the optimized version. There are several tools to help you do that: Visual Website Optimizer, Optimizely, Google Optimize and more.

 

That said, I think you should use segments instead of a filtered view or a custom report. There are multiple ways to do it - one of those approaches is to:

 

* Create an advanced segment and set it to include sessions that viewed one or more specific optimized pages. Then create an opposite segment; i.e. exlude all sessions that viewed those same pages. That will let you use all standard reports and analyze performance for each of those segments alone.

 

Since you're comparing different date ranges, there are many factors you need to take into account. Any variation in performance between the two segments can have multiple causal factors (optimized pages being one of them). Was the traffic composition the exact same mix? Was the exact same campaigns and promotions running? Did you change anything else on the website?

Best way to track optimized pages?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi, Thanks so much for your response! I believe I may need to clarify a few things. So the pages are all informational. The site is very, very, very large and consistently changing but the pages we are working on are in a distinct subset of informational pages. We know there will be factors we cannot quantify but the main idea is to just show the organic traffic pre-optimization and post-optimization.

 

The other figures would be time on site, increased pages per view, and overall organic traffic. 

 

We just want to isolate the exact 1800 and show the traffic pre-opt and post-opt. Which seems simple enough, but I can't figure it out.