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CTR ↑, Avg Pos ↑, Landingp. OK, but QS ↓ ? why and how?

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# 1
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some keywords in my campaigns baffle me.

 

a) the speech bubble for keywords in question tell me that the landing page is "average". 

so no problems there (no Quality score problem caused by landingpage)

 

b) speech bubble: relevance: average (no problems there either).

 

c) CTR at some keywords up to 10%

 

so now i have 3 green statements in my speech bubble and the values all look great.

 

but still, my QS is sometimes as low as 4.

 

Question 1: how come? and how to optimize for those keywords so that their QS goes up?

 

also....
Question 2: some CTRs are 5%+ and still the speech bubble says: "low average CTR".... (what does google think an "average CTR" is if not >5%?)

 

a liitle confused and ready for help.

as alwasys: thank you so much for your time.

2 Expert replyverified_user

Re: CTR ↑, Avg Pos ↑, Landingp. OK, but QS ↓ ? why and how?

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi floshkit, the first thing to realise is that a QS of 10/10 is not always possible for all keywords.  For some keywords, by their very nature, a score of 4/10 may actually be pretty good.  Quality Score is measured across all advertisers, not just you, a score of 4/10 may not saying your campaign needs improving but rather may be an indication of poor performance in general.

 

Secondly, although a 5% CTR may seem good, it's not actually that high.  I have Accounts where CTRs are routinely into double figures and sometimes regularly in the 20s upwards.  It could be worth looking at the Relative CTR column (you'll need to edit your column display to see this, and wait for the data to correlate, probably overnight) to see how your CTRs compare with those of other advertisers.  Of course if it shows you're very good, it doesn't help much!

 

It's also worth noting that "Average" is not the highest "score" for the speech bubble; each metric can be shown as "Above Average".  This is a difficult issue because you don't need them all to be "Above Average" to get a 10/10; I have keywords with a score of 10 that only have "Average" in all three but it does indicate there could be room for improvement.

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

Re: CTR ↑, Avg Pos ↑, Landingp. OK, but QS ↓ ? why and how?

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# 3
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>> some CTRs are 5%+ and still the speech bubble says: "low average CTR".... (what does google think an "average CTR" is if not >5%?)

 

This is the key to your question.

 

It doesn't matter what your _actual_ CTR is. What matters is how it compares to other advertisers for the same keywords at the same position.

 

You can have a CTR of 2%, think that's low, but if the historical CTR for all advertisers at that position is 1%, your QS will be high (7 to 10). Because your CTR is above the average. Conversely, if your CTR is 5% but the historical average is 8%, your QS will be below average (2 to 4).

 

So the answer on how to improve is to improve the CTR with better ads. By this definition, it is possible to improve any QS and there's no such thing as a 4 being "pretty good".

 

The Relative CTR column is for display campaigns only. It's the display network's equivalent of QS.

Re: CTR ↑, Avg Pos ↑, Landingp. OK, but QS ↓ ? why and how?

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

I'm a big fan of "Auction Insights" when it comes to a single keyword's performance. Just look at that and see who's beating you, then check out their ads for that search term (identical to the keyword) and see if they don't "sound" better than yours.

 

Those are the guys who, most likely, have a higher CTR than you have (or bid much higher than you do).

 

So work on your ads, maybe raise your bids a bit, and see how it goes. In this case, working on your ads may also mean adding ad extensions, because an ad's CTR attractability can be as much about the ad text as it is about the space it takes.

 

 

Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
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