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with or without the S?

Follower ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Follower ✭ ✭ ✭

broad match terms if I have

 

google widget 

google widgets

googles widget

googles widgets

 

Are these terms redundant with broad match? 

2 Expert replyverified_user
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

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Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: with or without the S?

Top Contributor
# 5
Top Contributor

Further to the other replies, I would point out that broad matches match any word in the keyword and can often match plurals so in essence all those keywords compete with each other.  A search for "widget" could trigger any of those keywords, for example (although it is more likely, I think, to trigger the singular).

 

Broad matches are really only ever effective when the keyword(s) used are very distinct and, preferably, unique.  For example, broad matches can work well with specific model numbers that can only possibly be one thing (like an HP printer, or a Sony TV), or for other terms that are tightly focused.  

 

I can't tell if the examples you've shown are your real keywords, but if they are, I would strongly suggest you move to phrase or even exact matches as soon as possible, otherwise your ads will be receiving impressions for every search for "google" or "widget", which will be a huge number, giving terrible CTR and very low relevance.

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

View solution in original post

Re: with or without the S?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 2
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

"Google widget" would pick up the plurals if you were using broad match. However, if you want to manage them seperately, I would recomend keeping them all in. "Google widgets" may perform a lot better than "Google widget," so you may want seperate bids for both. 

 

Re: with or without the S?

Follower ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Follower ✭ ✭ ✭

So while without may work, for a more grainular purpose, all iterations?

Re: with or without the S?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

That is correct. 

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: with or without the S?

Top Contributor
# 5
Top Contributor

Further to the other replies, I would point out that broad matches match any word in the keyword and can often match plurals so in essence all those keywords compete with each other.  A search for "widget" could trigger any of those keywords, for example (although it is more likely, I think, to trigger the singular).

 

Broad matches are really only ever effective when the keyword(s) used are very distinct and, preferably, unique.  For example, broad matches can work well with specific model numbers that can only possibly be one thing (like an HP printer, or a Sony TV), or for other terms that are tightly focused.  

 

I can't tell if the examples you've shown are your real keywords, but if they are, I would strongly suggest you move to phrase or even exact matches as soon as possible, otherwise your ads will be receiving impressions for every search for "google" or "widget", which will be a huge number, giving terrible CTR and very low relevance.

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

Re: with or without the S?

Follower ✭ ✭ ✭
# 6
Follower ✭ ✭ ✭

Thanks for the strong reply Cobnut. The true is that this is more of a hypothetical question. I have many campaigns with broadmatch terms, typically with or without the 's' side by one another. I have nevever seen much conversation on it, but have always been curious. 

Re: with or without the S?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 7
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I find I usually get better results from "phrase" and [exact] match keywords. However, broad match keywords are a great tool. I use them help find new keywords, using the "see search terms" button in the keywords tab. I have found some great keywords because of using broad match keywords. One caution is to always have good negatives when using broad match keywords. IF you are advertisng for Pepsi and you have a keyword, soda, you would want to add -baking as a negative so you ads don't show up for someone searching "baking soda."

Re: with or without the S?

[ Edited ]
Rising Star
# 8
Rising Star

Setting a keyword to broad match leaves it eligible to be served for plurals, possessives, and common mispellings.

 

I find Broad match a little dangerous Smiley Happy in the variety of searches it can be matched to unless, like Cobnut, I'm careful to use a highly descriptive phrase.

 

Another version of Broad match - Modified Broad - is starting to impress me, though. It can still pull a fairly wide variety of searches, but sometimes that's what I'm trying to do, and the modification means that wildly inappropriate (for my purposes) searches are much less likely.

 

A discussion of match types is available here:

 

http://support.google.com/adwords/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=175280


Theresa
Google AdWords Top Contributor
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