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using phrase match and exact match

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# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I am just starting my first campaign and have a few questions:

 

1.  It was suggested to me to use both phrase match AND exact match together....for example "website for sale" and [website for sale].  Is this right so I am hindering my campaign by doing this?

 

2.  Since I launched the campaign yesterday, I've constantly been modifying it but I read somewhere to just leave it along for about 24 hours until you see traffic coming in.  How often should you be tweaking your campaign?

 

3. I have a lot of keywords that are "below first page bid"...however, I've noticed that the number keeps dropping..is this common?

 

I appreciate any feedback

Chantal

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Accepted by topic author ChantalV
September 2015

Re: using phrase match and exact match

[ Edited ]
Badged Google Partner
# 4
Badged Google Partner

Moshe is right of course, it is used as a technique and it would've been better to say that I rarely use it, for several reasons:

 

  • Bidding lower or higher on that exact match keyword often leads to a different logic being applied. When bidding higher, the exact match should be used, when bidding lower, the exact match might only be used if with that lower bid it still has a higher ad rank than the broader matching keywords (otherwise there is a cheaper - lower cpc bid - matching keyword with a higher ad rank)
  • The exact match doesn't necessarily have a higher ROI and as such isn't necessarily worth a higher bid, especially if you have comprehensive negative keyword lists, increasing the relevance of the 1st point
  • It seems to behave strangely when adding an exact match keyword to an already well-performing adgroup with similar well-performing broader matching keywords. Higher ad rank for the broader matching keywords due to their history?

So I often prefer to put the exact match in a separate adgroup and use negative keywords for routing so that I'm perfectly sure which keyword is going to get triggered since the "preferences" and "exceptions" for dealing with similar keywords aren't always that transparent.

 

But please correct me if my reasoning above is wrong, it could save me some work Smiley Wink

 

EDIT: wrong link to support page

View solution in original post

Re: using phrase match and exact match

Badged Google Partner
# 2
Badged Google Partner

Hi Chantal,

 

  1. There is no need to use exact match and phrase match together for the same keyword, phrase match will match everything exact match matches and more. There are very few if any situations where it makes sense to use both.
  2. It's normal to change your campaign more often in the beginning. How often really depends on the type, size and context. Just take into account that adwords is very data-driven and that you need good data to make the right changes / decisions. Focus in the beginning on tightly defining your keywords and negative keywords, creating multiple good ads per ad group, having good quality scores, defining ad extensions and take it from there to see how it performs.
  3. This might indeed happen in the beginning especially if those keywords haven't gotten a lot of impressions yet. Wait until you have some data (impressions) before taking action. 

Hope this helps!

Re: using phrase match and exact match

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

On this - I disagree with Ken; (this could happen, though rarely to happen ....  Smiley Surprised )
The common practice, and most known strategy, most advertisers would follow,  would be to include all math types in the same ad group, and bid the highest on exact match, lower on phrase, and the lowest on broad (usually the BMM form is used).

 

The logic is that,  the tighter  keyword matches a search query - the higher you want to bid on it, so it could get a higher ad-rank, and (if high enough) the result will be a higher position.

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author ChantalV
September 2015

Re: using phrase match and exact match

[ Edited ]
Badged Google Partner
# 4
Badged Google Partner

Moshe is right of course, it is used as a technique and it would've been better to say that I rarely use it, for several reasons:

 

  • Bidding lower or higher on that exact match keyword often leads to a different logic being applied. When bidding higher, the exact match should be used, when bidding lower, the exact match might only be used if with that lower bid it still has a higher ad rank than the broader matching keywords (otherwise there is a cheaper - lower cpc bid - matching keyword with a higher ad rank)
  • The exact match doesn't necessarily have a higher ROI and as such isn't necessarily worth a higher bid, especially if you have comprehensive negative keyword lists, increasing the relevance of the 1st point
  • It seems to behave strangely when adding an exact match keyword to an already well-performing adgroup with similar well-performing broader matching keywords. Higher ad rank for the broader matching keywords due to their history?

So I often prefer to put the exact match in a separate adgroup and use negative keywords for routing so that I'm perfectly sure which keyword is going to get triggered since the "preferences" and "exceptions" for dealing with similar keywords aren't always that transparent.

 

But please correct me if my reasoning above is wrong, it could save me some work Smiley Wink

 

EDIT: wrong link to support page

Re: using phrase match and exact match

Top Contributor
# 5
Top Contributor
Interesting points by Ken...
@Chantal - you now have the whole picture...
Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’