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Wrong ad appears for people located in A but searching about B

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

The headline may be a bit confusing, so let me explain further. It is important to note that I am using the "Reach people in, searching for, or viewing pages about my targeted location" targeting option.

 

Let's say for example I am targeting people who need haircuts in Houston and Dallas. Each city has it's own unique ad copy that contains the city name to increase relevance. So if someone was in Dallas and searched "haircuts" they would get an ad copy focused on Dallas. However, if they were in Dallas and searched "haircuts Houston", they should get the Houston specific ad since they are looking for businesses there. 


Despite my campaigns being structured this way, ads are still appearing in the wrong city at the wrong time. Frequently the person in Dallas searching "haircut houston" is still getting the less relevant Dallas ad. Am I doing something wrong with the targeting?

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Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by MosheTLV (Top Contributor)
September 2015

Re: Wrong ad appears for people located in A but searching about B

Top Contributor
# 7
Top Contributor
Hi tbond21121,

If a person located in Houston includes Dallas in the query, you want to show the Dallas ad, right? Do you have "search intent" enabled in both campaign geo-targeting settings? If not, you should. That way if Dallas is in the query, the Dallas ad is eligible, but so is the Houston ad because of the location. You want to set a priority in this case, to be sure the correct ad is shown. By including Dallas as a negative keyword, you assure that this user sees the Dallas ad, not the Houston ad. Otherwise, it's up the AdRank as to which ad group will trigger the ad.

Let's say you have haircuts in both ad groups. You don't need geographic modifiers in a geo-targeted campaign, Google figures that out. Now, let's also say that haircuts in both ad groups have the same QS and bid (same AdRank). Google would then need to figure out which of your keywords/AdGroup is more relevant to the user. That leaves it a bit vague, and either ad could be triggered. Including Houston as negative in the Dallas group and Dallas in the Houston group will do just what you want and not leave the decision up to a computer algorithm.

What this won't take care of would be other geographic identifiers that may be included in the search query that Google would recognize as within your target area. Say your Dallas campaign also targets Ft. Worth. If Ft Worth is not included as a negative in the Houston campaign, you have the same situation you have now, a person search for "haircuts Ft Worth" could be shown the Houston ad instead.

Honestly, when a query is eligible for both location and search intent in 2 different campaigns, I do not know which gets the higher relevancy score. From your description above, the actual location seems to take priority. Adding the negative keywords should mitigate this. The two areas must be targeted in separate campaigns.

Best of Luck,

Pete
petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

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Re: Wrong ad appears for people located in A but searching about B

Participant ✭ ✭ ☆
# 2
Participant ✭ ✭ ☆
Hi TBOND21121,

Welcome to adwords community.
May be I am wrong to suggest you. But very simple ideas in my mind. Try to use DKI(Dynamic Keywords Insertion) in ad copy title rest description will same. If people searches haircut dallas your ads title will be same. and If people searches hair cut huston your ad title will be same and you will show relevant ads to your valuable customers.

I hope it helps you.

Re: Wrong ad appears for people located in A but searching about B

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor
Hi tbond21121,

I would not use DKI for this. It sounds to me like you have one campaign targeting both areas, possible one ad group with 2 ads?

If that's your setup, it's not going to work the way you think it will.

If you have 2 ads in one group, they simply rotate according to the campaign settings. All keywords in an ad group can trigger any ad in the group.

If you have one campaign targeting both areas, it won't be very effective. It would be better to split your campaign and target each city separately. Ad groups can be similar and should contain ads that are specific to the target area.

Now, in the Dallas group, add "Houston" as a negative keyword (broad or phrase) and in the Houston group add "Dallas" as a negative keyword (broad or phrase). This should have the effect you're looking for. If a person in Dallas include "Houston" in the search query, the Dallas ad is blocked by the negative keyword, so the Houston ad will show.

Best of Luck!

Pete
petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

Re: Wrong ad appears for people located in A but searching about B

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Each city actually has it's own individual campaign. The Houston campaign has it's own unique targeting and ad copy, as does Dallas. The issue is just that if someone is searching for 'Dallas Haircuts' while in Houston, we want them to still see the Dallas ad despite their location, because the Dallas ad is much more relevant to their search.

Re: Wrong ad appears for people located in A but searching about B

Top Contributor
# 5
Top Contributor
Hi tbond21121,

Oh, that's a different story. Sorry about that. What you can do is enter Dallas as phrase match negative to the Houston campaign and Dallas as phrase match negative in the Houston group. That should help.

Pete
petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

Re: Wrong ad appears for people located in A but searching about B

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 6
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Sorry to go on about this, but I might need a bit more of an explanation. Wouldn't putting Dallas as phrase match negative in the Houston campaign cause a problem? I want people in Houston to be able to see the Dallas ad if they are searching about Dallas. Wouldn't making Dallas a negative keyword in Houston make that impossible? I apologize if I'm missing something obvious here.
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by MosheTLV (Top Contributor)
September 2015

Re: Wrong ad appears for people located in A but searching about B

Top Contributor
# 7
Top Contributor
Hi tbond21121,

If a person located in Houston includes Dallas in the query, you want to show the Dallas ad, right? Do you have "search intent" enabled in both campaign geo-targeting settings? If not, you should. That way if Dallas is in the query, the Dallas ad is eligible, but so is the Houston ad because of the location. You want to set a priority in this case, to be sure the correct ad is shown. By including Dallas as a negative keyword, you assure that this user sees the Dallas ad, not the Houston ad. Otherwise, it's up the AdRank as to which ad group will trigger the ad.

Let's say you have haircuts in both ad groups. You don't need geographic modifiers in a geo-targeted campaign, Google figures that out. Now, let's also say that haircuts in both ad groups have the same QS and bid (same AdRank). Google would then need to figure out which of your keywords/AdGroup is more relevant to the user. That leaves it a bit vague, and either ad could be triggered. Including Houston as negative in the Dallas group and Dallas in the Houston group will do just what you want and not leave the decision up to a computer algorithm.

What this won't take care of would be other geographic identifiers that may be included in the search query that Google would recognize as within your target area. Say your Dallas campaign also targets Ft. Worth. If Ft Worth is not included as a negative in the Houston campaign, you have the same situation you have now, a person search for "haircuts Ft Worth" could be shown the Houston ad instead.

Honestly, when a query is eligible for both location and search intent in 2 different campaigns, I do not know which gets the higher relevancy score. From your description above, the actual location seems to take priority. Adding the negative keywords should mitigate this. The two areas must be targeted in separate campaigns.

Best of Luck,

Pete
petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords