AdWords
2.9K members online now
2.9K members online now
Get started with AdWords - learn the basics to get set up for success
Guide Me
star_border
Reply

When editing, deleting and restoring!!

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 1
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆

Hi

 

It is more of a thought than a questionSmiley Happy

 

Delete:

 

Adwords say that anything deleted cant be restored back in the account, I guess this means that it cant be restored " as it is" in the account.  Lets say I have a keyword "example" (broad) in one of my ad groups in collaboration with one matched ad in the same ad group. I delete the keyword and the keyword goes in the list of "deleted keywords" with all the performance stats it accrued (the stats are well visible).

 

Now if I again add the same keyword back in my keywords list in the same ad group irrelevant of the ads which I have, its same as restoring back the  deleted keyword, isnt it?? With a difference that its stats will start building from the time I have added it back to my list, but as far as whatever quality it had gained, it would be restored back!!

 

Also to sum up I can say that "deletion" and "pause" is the same. Just depends upon the user. So, if one mistankingly deletes any keyword he can very well add it back to the list (just the stat history will start again but the quality will remain the same or with a minute difference).

 

Edit

 

Now if I "edit" the same keyword and change its match type to exact ie. "[example]" its equivalent to deleting the broad match "example" and creating a fresh keyword [example]. The stats and performance which the broad "example" accrued will remain in the account.

 

Adwords say that one should avoid editing because in that case the performance history of that attribute is lost. Technically nothing is lost,its just that you deleted the attribute and have started running a new one which of course will start fresh and take time to build reputation and benefit the advertiser.

 

In the case defined just above, If I again edit the exact match [example] to broad match "example", It means that I have restored back a keyword which was in the deleted keyword list (broad- example) and though the stats of the new keyword will start again but the quality it had gained in the course of its running will be restored back live.

 

Correct me if I am missing something. Will wait for your feed backs.

 

Best

Mudit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Eric (Google Employee)
September 2015

Re: When editing, deleting and restoring!!

Badged Google Partner
# 2
Badged Google Partner

To begin with the latter..

 

Edit:

"Now if I "edit" the same keyword and change its match type to exact ie. "[example]" its equivalent to deleting the broad match "example" and creating a fresh keyword [example]."

Yes, "editing" a KW's match type will "delete" the broad term, and "add" the exact term... Sort of.

 

Yes, the edited match type will show as deleted when viewing all keywords. However, lately when I have reverted terms back to the preceeding match type within the UI, the previous historical data for the time frame re-appears. Something may have changed, maybe there's a change in beta testing, or maybe I'm just looney. Smiley Happy Yes, you are correct, but things are always changing... 

 

Delete:

 

Here's how I primarily distinguish deleted from paused, as an account manager: I cannot just click a button, and "re-activate" a deleted KW or ad, but I can click and "re-activate" a paused KW or ad. Yes you can re-create it, but that takes more work than just a single click, and yes I am just that lazy. Smiley Happy

 

My opinion on historical performance concerns:

 

As far as overall account "performance" statistics, and how it does or does not affect your current "performance", try no to be too concerned about it. It takes time to build and optimize an account. Market forces are always changing, the situation is always fluid. Overall historical account performance will, eventually improve over time, as you continue to optimize your account. What you determine "performance" to be, is key to your success.

 

If you have a conversion strategy, you may find that one, or just a few broad match keywords generate the most profitable converting traffic. Use the search terms report to find the few underlying exact match search terms that generate the most conversions. Then, try only advertising those few exact match terms, and maximize your impression share for those terms within your budget. Continue to try and improve other KPI's such as CTR (hoping to eventually improve QS) by testing and optimizing ad copy, ad extensions, network and device targeting, bidding options, and ad rotation settings.

 

Over time that will improve your account's historical "performance" no matter what metric you use to determine performance. It's easy to get lost in the debate over all the factors of quality score, and easy to forget the bigger picture. Do what works best for you, and makes you the most profit. If that "hurt's" your overall acoount QS (if there really is one, and/or if it's really of any wieght in the equation) in the short term, so be it. FInd where the profit is first, then optimize to improve ROI over time.

Tom

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Eric (Google Employee)
September 2015

Re: When editing, deleting and restoring!!

Badged Google Partner
# 2
Badged Google Partner

To begin with the latter..

 

Edit:

"Now if I "edit" the same keyword and change its match type to exact ie. "[example]" its equivalent to deleting the broad match "example" and creating a fresh keyword [example]."

Yes, "editing" a KW's match type will "delete" the broad term, and "add" the exact term... Sort of.

 

Yes, the edited match type will show as deleted when viewing all keywords. However, lately when I have reverted terms back to the preceeding match type within the UI, the previous historical data for the time frame re-appears. Something may have changed, maybe there's a change in beta testing, or maybe I'm just looney. Smiley Happy Yes, you are correct, but things are always changing... 

 

Delete:

 

Here's how I primarily distinguish deleted from paused, as an account manager: I cannot just click a button, and "re-activate" a deleted KW or ad, but I can click and "re-activate" a paused KW or ad. Yes you can re-create it, but that takes more work than just a single click, and yes I am just that lazy. Smiley Happy

 

My opinion on historical performance concerns:

 

As far as overall account "performance" statistics, and how it does or does not affect your current "performance", try no to be too concerned about it. It takes time to build and optimize an account. Market forces are always changing, the situation is always fluid. Overall historical account performance will, eventually improve over time, as you continue to optimize your account. What you determine "performance" to be, is key to your success.

 

If you have a conversion strategy, you may find that one, or just a few broad match keywords generate the most profitable converting traffic. Use the search terms report to find the few underlying exact match search terms that generate the most conversions. Then, try only advertising those few exact match terms, and maximize your impression share for those terms within your budget. Continue to try and improve other KPI's such as CTR (hoping to eventually improve QS) by testing and optimizing ad copy, ad extensions, network and device targeting, bidding options, and ad rotation settings.

 

Over time that will improve your account's historical "performance" no matter what metric you use to determine performance. It's easy to get lost in the debate over all the factors of quality score, and easy to forget the bigger picture. Do what works best for you, and makes you the most profit. If that "hurt's" your overall acoount QS (if there really is one, and/or if it's really of any wieght in the equation) in the short term, so be it. FInd where the profit is first, then optimize to improve ROI over time.

Tom

Re: When editing, deleting and restoring!!

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭