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What's the point in having narrowly defined keywords?

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# 1
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I was wondering what is the exact point in having a narrowly defined keyword? For instance, if I was a hypothetical car repair shop, and I worked on all makes and models in my area.  Why wouldn't I just use the keywords: +car +repair? 

 

Instead of:

+car +repair +toyota

+car +repair +honda

+car +repair +Somewhereville

 

When +car +repair would capture these search terms anyway?

 

Wouldn't narrowing defining the keyword only loose possible clicks? I thought maybe Google rewarded advertisers by having narrowly defined keywords because there would be less people bidding for them so the bid would be lower, but I don't think that is the case, since when the keyword is too narrow it says "Low Search Volume"

 

Thanks and any help and wrapping my head around this would be great. I'm having a hard time understanding why I'm spending so much time on keyword research when a few umbrella terms could suffice. 

 

 

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Accepted by topic author Alex C
February 2017

What's the point in having narrowly defined keywords?

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# 2
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@Alex C

 

One main reason is so you can optimize your bidding.  It's okay to supplement broad with more narrow words.

For example, you might want to have +car +repair  at $3.50 to cover all possible queries as you mentioned.
You know that higher end cars are more revenue, so it would make sense to bid $6.75 for +car +repair +bmw.  

Only in this more narrow instance are you willing to pay that much more.

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Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by topic author Alex C
February 2017

What's the point in having narrowly defined keywords?

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# 2
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@Alex C

 

One main reason is so you can optimize your bidding.  It's okay to supplement broad with more narrow words.

For example, you might want to have +car +repair  at $3.50 to cover all possible queries as you mentioned.
You know that higher end cars are more revenue, so it would make sense to bid $6.75 for +car +repair +bmw.  

Only in this more narrow instance are you willing to pay that much more.

What's the point in having narrowly defined keywords?

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hi Alex C,

David K has provided excellent advice. I'd like to add that creating ad groups by brand name could help. If a user searches for "car repair Honda", you will want to show an ad for Honda repair. If a user searches for "car repair Toyota", you will want to show an ad for Toyota repair. And so forth. In these cases, you will probably get more clicks if you show an ad with the brand name than if you show a more generic car repair ad. I'd suggest a separate ad group for each make of car, plus a generic group if no make is mentioned in the search query. You'll need to use negative keywords in each ad group to make sure the right ad group is selected. For this example, I'd add both Toyota and Honda as negative keywords in the generic group, add Honda as negative in the Toyota group, and add Toyota as a negative for the Honda group. I'd also suggest you bid a bit higher on the phrase and exact match keywords.

As for "+car +repair +Somewhereville", I'd suggest geo-targeting to limit your ad to showing to people in your area, or people located outside searching for your area but looking for your service within your area (search intent). Then I'd try to mention that location in your ad copy whenever possible.

To summarize, organizing your ad groups tightly by keyword helps you get more clicks, a better CTR, a better QS, and it helps you control your budget.

Best of Luck!

 

Pete

 

petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

What's the point in having narrowly defined keywords?

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# 4
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@Alex C  

@petebardo makes a very valid point here. That's actually how I would do it. I just wanted to illustrate a concept that answered your original question, but it's certainly not the optimal way of doing things for your scenario.