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Uncertainty concerning broad match, phrase match and exact match

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi all,

 

I realize I am a bit uncertain with the topic of broad match, phrase match, and exact match. Below I have listed some examples of what confuses me, and would really appreciate if someone would clarify for me, below are three examples I think is right, but might not be: 

1. I think that the phrases polish car and car polish is treated as the same phrase by Google, and so it is not needed to keep both phrases in and ad group

 

2. There is no benefit of having both car polish and [car polish] in the list of keywords, as the broad match phrase would be a match if the exact phrase was googled

 

3. There is no benefit of adding the phrase "i love to polish my car" as a keyword if I already have the keyword +polish +car

 

Having taken over some accounts that have been set up differently, I see so much different prectices that I get confused. Thankful for any help on this topic!

1 Expert replyverified_user
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Accepted by topic author Arne Michal P
July 2016

Re: Uncertainty concerning broad match, phrase match and exact match

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 2
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
Hi Arne,

Below is a quick run through of how the match types work (using your example).

Modified Broad Match - +car +polish
What modified broad match tells Google is that you would like to appear when both of these words appear in a search term, no matter what order they come in. So yes, your ad would appear for 'i love to polish my car'.

Phrase Match - "car polish"
What phrase match tells Google is that you would like to appear when both of these words appear in a search term, in that exact order. So in this instance, your advert would not appear for 'polish car', however it would appear for 'best car polish'.

Exact Match - [car polish]
What exact match tells Google is that you would like to appear when ONLY these words appear in a search term, in that exact order. So yes, again you would be correct in assuming that your advert would show for 'car polish'.

Hope this helps,

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Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Arne Michal P
July 2016

Re: Uncertainty concerning broad match, phrase match and exact match

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 2
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
Hi Arne,

Below is a quick run through of how the match types work (using your example).

Modified Broad Match - +car +polish
What modified broad match tells Google is that you would like to appear when both of these words appear in a search term, no matter what order they come in. So yes, your ad would appear for 'i love to polish my car'.

Phrase Match - "car polish"
What phrase match tells Google is that you would like to appear when both of these words appear in a search term, in that exact order. So in this instance, your advert would not appear for 'polish car', however it would appear for 'best car polish'.

Exact Match - [car polish]
What exact match tells Google is that you would like to appear when ONLY these words appear in a search term, in that exact order. So yes, again you would be correct in assuming that your advert would show for 'car polish'.

Hope this helps,

Re: Uncertainty concerning broad match, phrase match and exact match

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Thanks for quick reply!

That is clarifying. Will then Google treat one match as better than other?
So a simplified example: a person is googling "I love to polish my car", I have +car +polish as keyword in my campaign and my competitor has the phrase "i love to polish my car" in his, will my competitors advert be preferred by google over mine?

Thanks again!

Re: Uncertainty concerning broad match, phrase match and exact match

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor
Hi Arne,

It is not about any better match type. 1st, let me answer your query - if you are targeting +car +polish, vs your competitor targeting "i love to polish my car", google will put both these is the same auction and make them compete with each other. The one with the better Ad rank will have his ad showing. AdRank = Bid * Quality Score.

your competitor will most likely have a lower CPC that +car +polish. with your keyword, you target and compete against many search queries. the keyword itself is very generic. thus, the relevance may be poor and hence a poor CTR.. and hence a low QS.
for your competitor, he is competing with only someone searching for "i love to polish my car" in the exact same order is eligible to see my ad. this reduces competition significantly.
The drawback to this is that only people who had multiple variations of the search terms, will be able to get the traffic.

Here is a nice article and image to understand match types better - https://searchenginewatch.com/sew/how-to/2274277/google-adwords-keyword-match-types-and-negatives-th...

Hope this helps!
Cheers,
Shweta

AdWords Top Contributor
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Re: Uncertainty concerning broad match, phrase match and exact match

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Thanks, that makes perfect sense!

Re: Uncertainty concerning broad match, phrase match and exact match

Badged Google Partner
# 6
Badged Google Partner

Hey Arne Michal P,

Here is the Google help page that talks about Match types

including:

Broad Match 

Broad Match Modifier 

Phrase Match 

Exact match 

Negative Match

 

This is also a great chart that shows how they all work. (this is a screenshot from Google Help as well) 

 Keyword Match type chart.png