AdWords
1.7K members online now
1.7K members online now
Get started with AdWords - learn the basics to get set up for success
Guide Me
star_border
Reply

Two separate businesses each with it's own domain competing for 95% the same keywords.

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Two separate businesses each with it's own domain competing for 99% the same keywords but providing different services.

 

Business #1 is a service provider.

 

Business #2 is a lead generator for the industry in which #1 is in.

 

I plan to run two separate accounts, one for each business form my managers account. 

 

Would these two businesses compete with each other and is there any violations of any policies?

 

Thank you

3 Expert replyverified_user

Two separate businesses each with it's own domain competing for 95% the same keywords.

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

This is probably not what you are going to want to hear - but Google will take a dim view of this... here's why...

 

you may have a very clear delimitation in your mind between the two pages - but just for a moment, put yourself in your competitor's shoes. Do your two ads appearing in the search results seem fair?  No...

 

Here's how Google look at it... are there two accounts looking to reach the same people using the same keyword at the same time going to domains owned by the same person(s)? If so, then it's in violation of policy.

 

If these domains are part of the same business, here's what you have to do - you set up a single account - with two (or more) campaigns within it - one campaign runs ads for Business 1 - the other for Business 2

 

What then happens is that Google looks at the search query, then at your keywords and decides which of your ads - for Business 1 or Business 2 - is the closest fit and serves that ad.

 

Now I can hear you protest... "But I want both ads to appear!" - basically, because you want to have two hooks in the water thinking that you've got twice as much chance of catching a fish! And that's why Google don't allow it. No-one should be able to double (or triple or quadruple) their chance of their ad appearing.

 

Now - if these two sites are from different companies whose accounts you manage, who happen to be in the same sector, that would be a different thing since it would not be a single business entity that was trying to serve two ads.

 

So the real question here is... are Business 1 and Business 2 really two separate businesses with nothing to do with one another?

 

Answer this question and all the others will then fall into place.

 

.

Two separate businesses each with it's own domain competing for 95% the same keywords.

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

II agree with @stickleback

If the businesses are owned by the same entity - this  seems to be a violation, because they target the same audience, for the same or similar services.

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’

Two separate businesses each with it's own domain competing for 95% the same keywords.

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Business #1 and business #2 are two separate registered legitimate businesses.

 

Business #1 is a small local  service provider

Business #2 is a lead gen covering bigger area than #1 and selling leads to a number of businesses including #1.

 

#1 is owned by Owner A 

#2 is owned by Owners A and B

 

Domain #1 is registered to business #1

Domain #1 is owned by Owner A

 

Common thing between two businesses is Owner A but businesses are running separately. 

 

So the answer to the real question is: - they are two separate genuine businesses, but there is one person involved in both. Is this a clear violation of policy? 

Two separate businesses each with it's own domain competing for 95% the same keywords.

Rising Star
# 5
Rising Star

Hi Maksim,

 

My interpretation of the policy is that as long as you are offering a different product or service, or even the same product at a different price point, or something that makes the offers of each site different, that is OK.

 

But, and this is a big but, because all policies are open to interpretation, your ability to use AdWords could come down to the opinion of one person who checks ads and sites. 

 

Business #2 covers a much wider area? Then my advice is to use one account, and give the two sites their own unique advertising areas.

 

 

 

Re: Two separate businesses each with it's own domain competing for 95% the same keywords.

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor

 

@RobSkelton;

When Google checks "unfair advantage" 3 criteria  are checked:

  • The targeted audience (whether demographic  or geographical) 
  • The products offered 
  •  And the entity promoting the products.

(Price is no longer serves as a main criterion)

 

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’

Two separate businesses each with it's own domain competing for 95% the same keywords.

Rising Star
# 7
Rising Star

Thanks Moshe,

 

Noted - price is no longer a factor.

 

Two separate businesses each with it's own domain competing for 95% the same keywords.

Badged Google Partner
# 8
Badged Google Partner

Will they "compete"? Yes, because they are different accounts.

 

Is there a policy violation - I understand the situation to be as @RobSkelton outlined. Even with common ownership, if they are two distinct businesses, then that may not be a violation.

 

The entire premise seems flawed to me though. If the lead generation really works, then why wouldn't the service provider just rely on the lead gen site/business for growth? If the lead gen doesn't work, then why would you spend money to advertise something you don't generate any return from? The only angle I can see is if you are selling those leads, but in that case your direct competitors are the only ones in the market for those leads. Which means that you are competing against yourself on every level.

 

If, on the other hand, the service provider only specializes in providing service for a specific niche of that market, then it kind of makes sense from a business perspective. If you only want to target the high end of the industry, but you are very good at generating leads for areas you don't service, then why not get a little piece of everything? If that's the case, then there will be different KW's, ads, and strategies for each side of the business. Focus on the niche that the service provider wants to target for their account. Perhaps you would be willing to pay a little more for a direct lead to the business because the margins are higher. Then have a broader focus with perhaps lower bids/costs for the lead gen, because the margins aren't nearly as high for that side of the business.

 

Two different business models, two different advertising strategies. Then a lot of those policy concerns go out the window, because you no longer have any overlap.

Tom