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Targeting specific long tail phrases

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Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Would love to know if you see the benefits of using 2 sets of keywords, one a longer tail version.

The phrases I'd use are:
guitar course
guitar course for beginners

I'm targeting both beginners and more advanced students.

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Accepted by topic author Ratko I
January 2017

Targeting specific long tail phrases

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

hey Ratko, 

 

Shorter keywords will attract a larger amount of search queries, thus expanding your reach but also perhaps attracting traffic which is less relevant for you. 

 

The benefit of long tail keywords is a few: 

#1 You can tap into very long tail keywords that are often cheaper than shorter ones because less people are bidding on said keywords. 

#2 Long tail keywords can often get you a higher quality score (assuming your ad and service you are offering are relevant). 

#3 Long tail keywords can be higher quality traffic

 

On the downside you may be restricting the amount of impressions and clicks that you could possible get when using a much broader keyword.

 

This also again depends on keyword matching options.

 

Let me know if this helps!  

Joshua, Top Contributor
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Ratko I
January 2017

Targeting specific long tail phrases

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

hey Ratko, 

 

Shorter keywords will attract a larger amount of search queries, thus expanding your reach but also perhaps attracting traffic which is less relevant for you. 

 

The benefit of long tail keywords is a few: 

#1 You can tap into very long tail keywords that are often cheaper than shorter ones because less people are bidding on said keywords. 

#2 Long tail keywords can often get you a higher quality score (assuming your ad and service you are offering are relevant). 

#3 Long tail keywords can be higher quality traffic

 

On the downside you may be restricting the amount of impressions and clicks that you could possible get when using a much broader keyword.

 

This also again depends on keyword matching options.

 

Let me know if this helps!  

Joshua, Top Contributor
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’

Targeting specific long tail phrases

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hey Joshua,

 

Thank you for the response!

 

I have an additional question Smiley Happy

 

If I use phrase match, and do "guitar course" I would be competing for both searches from my example, right? Is there a benefit to have them both then? I assume there is, due to specific target (beginners) and I can structure the ad (if I create one ad set just for beginners) to match the message to that keyword, but would love to understand the benefits a bit more from that search.

Targeting specific long tail phrases

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

Lets say you know that the phrase "guitar course for beginners" is a keyword with a high conv. rate and ROI. It would probably be in your best interest to target this exact keyword with phrase and exact with a higher bid than just "guitar course". 

 

The logic is that because you value this more specific keyword more you're willing to bid more for it as well! 

Joshua, Top Contributor
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’

Targeting specific long tail phrases

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Makes a lot of sense! Thanks!

 

I have only one question that's bugging me Smiley Very Happy

 

Would you add a negative keyword to the shorter phrase as well? So they don't compete for the same search?