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Such thing as "modified phrase" keyword?

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# 1
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Suppose i sell red fluffy shoes.... and want to target city...

 

is this something that u can do on adwords?

 

+"los angeles" red fluffy shoes

 

 

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Accepted by topic author taewoo
September 2015

Re: Such thing as "modified phrase" keyword?

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# 2
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Hi Taewoo, Modified Phrase Match is not currently supported. You can get close using Modified Broad +los +angeles red +fluffy +shoes will match queries that contain all the terms with a preceding plus sign, but they can appear in search queries in any order. New Wiki on Match Types: http://www.en.adwords-community.com/t5/Set-up-and-basics/Keyword-Match-Types-for-Search-Campaigns/ta... -Tom
Tommy Sands, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
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Accepted by topic author taewoo
September 2015

Re: Such thing as "modified phrase" keyword?

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# 2
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Hi Taewoo, Modified Phrase Match is not currently supported. You can get close using Modified Broad +los +angeles red +fluffy +shoes will match queries that contain all the terms with a preceding plus sign, but they can appear in search queries in any order. New Wiki on Match Types: http://www.en.adwords-community.com/t5/Set-up-and-basics/Keyword-Match-Types-for-Search-Campaigns/ta... -Tom
Tommy Sands, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
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Re: Such thing as "modified phrase" keyword?

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# 3
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Tom, thanks as always.

Near phrase near Exact match types

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# 4
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Though, there have been rumors that they are coming soon....

 

http://www.sleepinggiantmedia.co.uk/posts/google-releases-near-phrase-and-near-exact-match-types/

 

-Moshe

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Re: Near phrase near Exact match types

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# 5
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Moshe,

 

I saw that same article just last week.  It threw me off big time when I was writing about Match Types. Smiley Happy  I think having those 'near' options will be another great tool to have.

 

-Tom

Tommy Sands, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
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Re: Near phrase near Exact match types

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# 6
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Moshe, I am very suspicious about this article because on what grounds this article has been published. As per the official Adwords blog, there has been no such announcement.

Re: Near phrase near Exact match types

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# 7
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Pankaj;

I was also sceptical at first, but then, noticed on a Spanish TC G+ another link

 

So, is there smoke without a fire?

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Re: Such thing as "modified phrase" keyword?

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# 8
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Hi Taewoo,

 

The other guys have told that "modified phrase" is not an option. You're example here actually shows a combination of match types. You can't do that either.

 

On the other hand, targeting a city is best done with geo-targeting rather than with keywords. When you geo-target your campaign to Los Angeles, and your keyword is "red fluffly shoes" (yes, that's phrase match), a search query of "los angeles red fluffy shoes" will trigger your ad. Further a keyword [red fluffy shoes] (exact match) could also be triggered by the same query.

 

It's really not necessary to include locations in your keywords if your campaign is properly targeted geographically.

 

Best of Luck!

 

Pete

 

petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords