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Structuring AdWords account for multi-location businesses?

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# 1
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Hello brainstrust!

 

Bit of background: I'm looking after the AdWords account for a business with multiple physical locations. The locations are in many different neighbourhoods all over the country, with multiple locations close to each other - some are even across the street. Each location sells multiple products. And, each state controls their own spend. We need to run ongoing AdWords campaigns, but I'm also regularly asked to 'boost' individual locations or products. It's pretty convoluted!

 

At the moment I'm structuring the account as follows: neighbourhoods at the Campaign level, products at the Ad Group level, and offers at the Ad level.

So a campaign could be (State) Inner City, an Ad Group could be Product A, and the Ads would be the various offers / features / benefits for that product with ads for each individual location within the geographical neighbourhood.

 

And now my questions: Has anyone done something similar? What did your solution look like? Will this even work in the long run?

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Accepted by topic author Alex C
February 2017

Structuring AdWords account for multi-location businesses?

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor

Alex,

 

With the same domain, if you have multiple locations close to each other, you can put ads for each in the same ad group and set the campaign settings for ads to rotate evenly. It won't be perfect, but it is a way of fairly allocating ad spend between them without any favouritism.

 

 

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Structuring AdWords account for multi-location businesses?

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi Alex,

 

Your plan looks good, and will work wherever you can give each location its own location settings in AdWords.

 

If they ever share location settings, it depends on whether their websites are on the same domain, or whether they are on different domains or sub-domains.

 

 

Structuring AdWords account for multi-location businesses?

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

In this case, location extension could improve performance.

https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2404182?hl=en

 

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Structuring AdWords account for multi-location businesses?

Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
# 4
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Hi Rob,

 

Glad to hear it! Luckily, everything is on the same domain so in the most densely populated areas where we have 10+ locations in walking distance, generic link extensions are being used.

Structuring AdWords account for multi-location businesses?

Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
# 5
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I do have location extensions enabled, however I'm wary of using them in the instances where state representatives want to promote specific locations in case the incorrect location extension is shown alongside an ad for a specific nearby location we are promoting. 

Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by topic author Alex C
February 2017

Structuring AdWords account for multi-location businesses?

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor

Alex,

 

With the same domain, if you have multiple locations close to each other, you can put ads for each in the same ad group and set the campaign settings for ads to rotate evenly. It won't be perfect, but it is a way of fairly allocating ad spend between them without any favouritism.

 

 

Structuring AdWords account for multi-location businesses?

Badged Google Partner
# 7
Badged Google Partner

"Will this even work in the long run?"

 

No. Well, yes and no. The instant that a franchisee or specific store manager sees something they don't like, you're going to have to deal with that mess. You can create a structure that "works" for you, but good luck explaining all the subtleties and nuances of targeted online marketing to every single person in the company.

 

The only real solution is to have a corporate level strategy and agreement at the highest level as to which approach you are taking. That's why you don't see McDonald's, Starbucks and the like using any store specific advertising strategies. You build the brand at the highest level, and have a functional website that allows users to find the "right" location for them. 

 

You are either going to have to change your approach at the corporate level, or readjust the expectations at the store level.

Tom