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Strange keyword: "converse more:label_converse more:shoes"

[ Edited ]
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi community,

 

I've recently audited an account and came accross the following keyword:

 

"converse more:label_converse more:shoes"

 

The keyword triggered for search queries like an ordinary phrase match ("converse"). However, changing a single parameter in the keyword results in either "low search volume" or an error message ("Item not found").

 

It was an ordinary search campaign and most of the clicks came from Google Search itself, and not from Search Partners, which can be an source for really strange queries Smiley Wink

 

Is this just some weird display error in the adwords interface or some sci-fi keyword modifier I was not aware of?

 

 

1 Expert replyverified_user

Re: Strange keyword: "converse more:label_converse more:shoes&quo

Community Manager
# 2
Community Manager
Hi Marcel,

Haven't seen that before, so don't think it's a sci-fi keyword modifier Smiley Happy

Was it only matching to "converse" in phrase match? Or did it match to anything else? I ran some tests with more:label on Google.com and it kind of treated it as if nothing was there. So I'm wondering if just ignores that parameter and phrase-matches to "converse."

Re: Strange keyword: "converse more:label_converse more:shoes&quo

Google Employee
# 3
Google Employee

Hi Marcel,

 

Just to add to Coco's reply, the system can ignore certain punctuation in search queries (depending on the context of the query). Punctuation is sometimes stripped from the query and sometimes is not.

 

The following are special cases:

 

    • The following non alphanumeric characters are considered valid in the online interface:  - # $ + [] : ' " . / & _  However, AdWords will still ignore these characters.
    • All punctuation characters except & . _ are stripped out of the search terms and treated as spaces. The characters & . _ may or may not be stripped out depending on each individual context.

So the unusual punctuation may have been stripped out. 

 

I know you mentioned this, but it looks to me like a search partner string. Were there any clicks from search partners?