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Seems a bit strange to me

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I am new at this, so could somebody please explain how and why the following occurs.

 

I created a “Search Network Text Advert”

My product is low value item, so I need to be very frugal with the cost per click amount.

I spent a lot of time using the keyword tool to choose words that were of a low value, some did not have a value at all – but they were marked as low competition. I thought I would bid an amount that would generously supersede googles estimated value, thinking there would not be a bidding war on all of these words.

Then I get a message on my adwords for all of them saying that the “bid is too low for the first page”

So, my thoughts are I can’t afford more than what I have bid so I will stay on the second page.

I am getting impressions on some of these terms and even 1 click were I paid were I paid my maximum bid.

So then I decided to search for the terms that I have bid on and were getting impressions and much to my surprise my advert was no were to be found not on page 1 or 2. In fact some terms did not show any advertising down the side at all.

I could not find my advert even on the term were I paid for a click

 

It seems that what Adwords is reporting to me is very different to what is actually being show when someone searches.

 

Please advise many thanks

1 Expert replyverified_user
2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Rosa M
September 2015

Re: Seems a bit strange to me

[ Edited ]
Rising Star
# 3
Rising Star

Good morning.

 

While Ahmed Ali has offered some good thoughts, I'm not quite sure that's he's answered your specific question.

 

There are actually a lot of things going on and I hope I can offer some information that's more helpful than confusing. Smiley Happy

 

First, when you search for your own ads, I do hope you're using the Ad Preview tool in your account, instead of searching in the 'live' Google search environment. It's important to use the tool for a lot of reasons, not the least of which is that if your ad is not triggered to show, the tool offers diagnostics and some ideas for why the ad might not be appearing.

 

Second, the "first page bid estimates" that the program offers are the bids it calculates are needed to get your ads showing on the first page of the SERPs pretty much all the time. It's not necessary to bid that high if you can't afford or don't want to spend that much on clicks and not bidding up to the estimate doesn't mean your ads will never show up on the first page of the search results.

 

Third, let's talk about keywords and search volume. 

 

To begin with, the match type you select for your keywords is obviously incredibly important. For the sake of this discussion, though, I'll assume you're using all Exact match keywords.

 

Leaving any question of bid amounts aside at the moment, the "low volume" message you see for some keywords means that few or no potential customers are searching using that phrase. The keyword may not even be in the Google advertising database--it may not be one of the search phrases that triggers ads. (This would be why you'd do searches and see no ads at all.)

 

Contrary to what you might believe, not every possible combination of words is included in the advertising database. This means that a strategy of deliberately choosing low volume keywords (to try to avoid competiton) will backfire. Anyone trying this could see that their ads are never triggered at all. 

 

That is, unless they have selected to have "close variants" served on their keywords (on the Settings tab of the campaign). If "close variants" are active, the advertiser might see a very, very low volume of impressions accumulating, as the program tries to find keywords that are included in it's database that seem to be appropriate for the advertiser's campaign.

 

(The other reason an advertiser might see occasional impressions on a low-volume keyword is because the program does rotate though "tests" of low/no volume search phrases, to see if volume is increasing, but let's not get complicated.)

 

Fourth and last, let's talk budget.

 

Again, contrary to what many advertisers might think, most ads are not eligible to compete for all the search traffic available in a day. Daily budget has a big impact on this--if your daily spending is capped at an amount that limits your ads to just a few clicks a day, then the system is going to trigger your ads slowly, trying not to overrun your budget. Your ads may be allowed to compete in no more than one or two ad auctions an hour.*  

 

Your keyword bid also dictates which auctions your ad can compete in. If you're using bids much lower than the rest of the competitive marketplace, it may be that your ads have such low ad rank (quality score x bid) that they're just not able to compete for most of the traffic.

 

It's all actually a little more complex than this Smiley Happy but I'm trying to answer your specific questions without confusing you too much. 

 

Please feel free to ask more questions if you're still not quite understanding what's going on with your advertising.

 

 

____________

 

* Another very good reason not to search the "live" environment for your own ads. If your ads are getting to enter only 1 or 2 ad auctions an hour (or even less), then any time they do win the auction to be displayed, you want them displayed to a potential customer, not to you. 

 

That is, any time you see your own ad, you've lost the chance to show it to a customer.


Theresa
Google AdWords Top Contributor
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Rosa M
September 2015

Re: Seems a bit strange to me

Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆
# 5
Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆
Search engine results pages Smiley Happy

View solution in original post

Re: Seems a bit strange to me

Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆
# 2
Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆
Hi,

The first search results page is very important to Google, Google will only show relevant results on this page even if your ad is the only ad (there're no competitors). Google will not sacrifice by its reputation by showing irrelevant search results.

I agree with you, don't raise your bids, but you should work on improving your quality score. A high quality score can result in decreasing your overall costs and increase your ad position and ROI.

There's a lot of things to do to improve your quality score, but before going over these things your adwords account should be well-structured account consists of separate campaign for each product/service, each of those campaigns in turn consists of tightly themed ad groups focus on each specific product or theme and each ad group contains specific numbers of keywords that related directly to ad content and relevant to the landing page.

The following articles include the main keys you should focus on to improve your quality score:
https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2454010
https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2404196

You should also understand ad rank and ad position:
https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/1722122

Hope that helps!
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Rosa M
September 2015

Re: Seems a bit strange to me

[ Edited ]
Rising Star
# 3
Rising Star

Good morning.

 

While Ahmed Ali has offered some good thoughts, I'm not quite sure that's he's answered your specific question.

 

There are actually a lot of things going on and I hope I can offer some information that's more helpful than confusing. Smiley Happy

 

First, when you search for your own ads, I do hope you're using the Ad Preview tool in your account, instead of searching in the 'live' Google search environment. It's important to use the tool for a lot of reasons, not the least of which is that if your ad is not triggered to show, the tool offers diagnostics and some ideas for why the ad might not be appearing.

 

Second, the "first page bid estimates" that the program offers are the bids it calculates are needed to get your ads showing on the first page of the SERPs pretty much all the time. It's not necessary to bid that high if you can't afford or don't want to spend that much on clicks and not bidding up to the estimate doesn't mean your ads will never show up on the first page of the search results.

 

Third, let's talk about keywords and search volume. 

 

To begin with, the match type you select for your keywords is obviously incredibly important. For the sake of this discussion, though, I'll assume you're using all Exact match keywords.

 

Leaving any question of bid amounts aside at the moment, the "low volume" message you see for some keywords means that few or no potential customers are searching using that phrase. The keyword may not even be in the Google advertising database--it may not be one of the search phrases that triggers ads. (This would be why you'd do searches and see no ads at all.)

 

Contrary to what you might believe, not every possible combination of words is included in the advertising database. This means that a strategy of deliberately choosing low volume keywords (to try to avoid competiton) will backfire. Anyone trying this could see that their ads are never triggered at all. 

 

That is, unless they have selected to have "close variants" served on their keywords (on the Settings tab of the campaign). If "close variants" are active, the advertiser might see a very, very low volume of impressions accumulating, as the program tries to find keywords that are included in it's database that seem to be appropriate for the advertiser's campaign.

 

(The other reason an advertiser might see occasional impressions on a low-volume keyword is because the program does rotate though "tests" of low/no volume search phrases, to see if volume is increasing, but let's not get complicated.)

 

Fourth and last, let's talk budget.

 

Again, contrary to what many advertisers might think, most ads are not eligible to compete for all the search traffic available in a day. Daily budget has a big impact on this--if your daily spending is capped at an amount that limits your ads to just a few clicks a day, then the system is going to trigger your ads slowly, trying not to overrun your budget. Your ads may be allowed to compete in no more than one or two ad auctions an hour.*  

 

Your keyword bid also dictates which auctions your ad can compete in. If you're using bids much lower than the rest of the competitive marketplace, it may be that your ads have such low ad rank (quality score x bid) that they're just not able to compete for most of the traffic.

 

It's all actually a little more complex than this Smiley Happy but I'm trying to answer your specific questions without confusing you too much. 

 

Please feel free to ask more questions if you're still not quite understanding what's going on with your advertising.

 

 

____________

 

* Another very good reason not to search the "live" environment for your own ads. If your ads are getting to enter only 1 or 2 ad auctions an hour (or even less), then any time they do win the auction to be displayed, you want them displayed to a potential customer, not to you. 

 

That is, any time you see your own ad, you've lost the chance to show it to a customer.


Theresa
Google AdWords Top Contributor
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

Re: Seems a bit strange to me

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Thanks so much for the posts and links.

 

I had a very simplified auction process in my head.

And I did not know there were diagnostics in the preview tool (pretty silly considering its called  “Ad Preview and Diagnosis“)

There is just so much to get my head around.

Just one other question for now, what are SERPs?

 

Kind regards Rosa

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Rosa M
September 2015

Re: Seems a bit strange to me

Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆
# 5
Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆
Search engine results pages Smiley Happy

Re: Seems a bit strange to me

Rising Star
# 6
Rising Star

Good morning, Rosa M.

 

The AdWords product is much more complicated than it appears at first, yes. I would strongly suggest that you read through the material in the AdWords Help Center to learn a bit more about the parts of the program and how they all work together.

 

And, of course, post again whenever you have more questions!


Theresa
Google AdWords Top Contributor
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

Re: Seems a bit strange to me

Rising Star
# 7
Rising Star

Good morning, Rosa M.

 

The AdWords product is much more complicated than it appears at first, yes. I would strongly suggest that you read through the material in the AdWords Help Center to learn a bit more about the parts of the program and how they all work together.

 

And, of course, post again whenever you have more questions!


Theresa
Google AdWords Top Contributor
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*