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Questions to ask new client when setting up Adwords

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hello Google Community! What a fabulous resource this is.

I'm new to Adwords, and working on my certification. I've recently been contacted by several local businesses to help them get started with Adwords. 

Is there a recommended set of questions to ask a new client when you're first sitting down to get things setup for them?  

I feel as though it would be best to streamline/systemize the beginning of the process at least. I realize that each client will have different needs, and having a solid base of information from the client will help to build a solid overall Adwords strategy for them.

If there's not a specific resource available with commonly used questions, what would your recommendations be for essential questions to ask a new client when setting up their Adwords account and first Adwords campaign?

Thank you!

2 Expert replyverified_user
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Raylene W
April 2016

Re: Questions to ask new client when setting up Adwords

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor

Hi @Raylene W, I hope you find the articles useful; at some point I should really re-organise or re-title them into some sort of easily findable system...

 

From a new client perspective, I think it's vital that you establish their goals and then make an honest assessment of their achievability.  One of the most common misconceptions I come across with new advertisers is that AdWords can somehow "magically" produce sales where organic and other channels could not and, of course, in almost all cases this isn't true.  Unless a product/service is completely new and unknown to the web/the public in general, for most product sales AdWords works best at extending an existing sales base.  Too often I see Campaigns aimed at producing sales for a product that has poor performance from other channels and it's important to explain to your clients that if it doesn't sell by any other means, AdWords is unlikely to be able to pull any rabbits out of the hat.

 

Look closely at any existing sales data they have.  Don't spend as much money in Nevada as you do in Maine if they have ten years of sales data to show they've never sold a single unit in Nevada.  Look at their shipping policies; do they offer free shipping and, if so, does the cost of this impact their bottom line?  You may want to adjust bids by State to account for this.  If a client sells a lot of products, don't try to promote them all from day one.  Get the client to give you a list of the top ten or twenty best products based upon sales numbers and profitability.  Start with those because they give you the best chance of producing an early positive return on investment.  This keeps the client happy that AdWords is making a profit, and gives you (hopefully) more funds to start extending that product list further.

 

Emphasise that AdWords is unlikely to be an overnight success and that reaching the "best" results could take months, perhaps even years, depending upon the size and nature of the client.

 

Explain that AdWords (and the Net in general) is a very fluid environment, that it's not necessarily possible (or desirable) to compare March 2015 figures to March 2016 because of this fluidity.  

 

Most of all, make sure they understand that AdWords is just one part of the purchase path and that their site, their prices, their support staff and so on have as much, if not more, of an impact on performance as AdWords does.  As we often say, all AdWords can do is lead a potential customer to the door, what happens after that is up to the other processes.

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

View solution in original post

Re: Questions to ask new client when setting up Adwords

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi there;

Our fellow TC @Jon_Gritton wrote a series of Articles on the topic;

Here is the first one:

Where to Start (I) - Before you begin with AdWords

 

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’

Re: Questions to ask new client when setting up Adwords

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Thank you @MosheTLV.

That article is a great start. Could you help me find the following articles? I feel a little silly not being able to track them down.

Thanks!

Re: Questions to ask new client when setting up Adwords

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

Here you are:

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’

Re: Questions to ask new client when setting up Adwords

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Thank you!
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Raylene W
April 2016

Re: Questions to ask new client when setting up Adwords

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor

Hi @Raylene W, I hope you find the articles useful; at some point I should really re-organise or re-title them into some sort of easily findable system...

 

From a new client perspective, I think it's vital that you establish their goals and then make an honest assessment of their achievability.  One of the most common misconceptions I come across with new advertisers is that AdWords can somehow "magically" produce sales where organic and other channels could not and, of course, in almost all cases this isn't true.  Unless a product/service is completely new and unknown to the web/the public in general, for most product sales AdWords works best at extending an existing sales base.  Too often I see Campaigns aimed at producing sales for a product that has poor performance from other channels and it's important to explain to your clients that if it doesn't sell by any other means, AdWords is unlikely to be able to pull any rabbits out of the hat.

 

Look closely at any existing sales data they have.  Don't spend as much money in Nevada as you do in Maine if they have ten years of sales data to show they've never sold a single unit in Nevada.  Look at their shipping policies; do they offer free shipping and, if so, does the cost of this impact their bottom line?  You may want to adjust bids by State to account for this.  If a client sells a lot of products, don't try to promote them all from day one.  Get the client to give you a list of the top ten or twenty best products based upon sales numbers and profitability.  Start with those because they give you the best chance of producing an early positive return on investment.  This keeps the client happy that AdWords is making a profit, and gives you (hopefully) more funds to start extending that product list further.

 

Emphasise that AdWords is unlikely to be an overnight success and that reaching the "best" results could take months, perhaps even years, depending upon the size and nature of the client.

 

Explain that AdWords (and the Net in general) is a very fluid environment, that it's not necessarily possible (or desirable) to compare March 2015 figures to March 2016 because of this fluidity.  

 

Most of all, make sure they understand that AdWords is just one part of the purchase path and that their site, their prices, their support staff and so on have as much, if not more, of an impact on performance as AdWords does.  As we often say, all AdWords can do is lead a potential customer to the door, what happens after that is up to the other processes.

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

Re: Questions to ask new client when setting up Adwords

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 7
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
The articles, and this response, have been extremely helpful, @Jon_Gritton! These expert insights are invaluable, and I appreciate the information so much.

Thanks again!!