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Question About Key Word Status

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I can't figure out the whole thing around key word status. For example, for my stone ground grits ad that sends searchers to my stone ground grits page, one of my key words is, surprise...stone ground grits.  Here's the status of that keyword:

 

Showing ads right now?
No
 
  • Your keyword isn't triggering ads to appear on Google right now due to a low Ad Rank. Ads are ranked based on your bid and Quality Score. What can I do?

Quality score Learn more

4/10
 

So...as nearly as I can tell, a keyword taken directly from the ad and referring directly to the product on the landing page has a low score and is not triggering ads to appear.  But there is no problem with keyword relevance, landing page quality or landing page load time.

Maybe it's just me but I think this is really hard to figure out.

2 Expert replyverified_user
4 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Eric (Google Employee)
September 2015

Re: Question About Key Word Status

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi ohiorick, beleive me, you're not alone being confused by the Quality Score system.  It can be very hard to track down what the exact problem is especially, as in your case, where you're seeing "No problems" across the board.

 

Can I ask what match type you're using for your keywords?  As I'm sure you've read, relevance is an important factor in QS but while it may seem that "stone ground grits" is highly relevant to your site, it depends on the match type.  If you're using stone ground grits as a broad match type, your ads could be triggered for any one of those three words, so could trigger on "stone roses", or "ground zero", for example, which obviously have a low relevance.

 

Historical CTR (click-through-rate) is also important.  You don't mention what your CTR rates are but if they're "lowish" (say less than 5%), this could be a factor and indicate that your ad copy (text) could be improved.

 

You've also left out the bit about "your bid".  It may be that your bid is too low and this is having a "knock-on" effect on other factors.  For example, if your bid means your ad is appearing in a low position, it'll get fewer impressions, lower CTR, which means it has a poorer quality score which means it gets a lower position which means it gets fewer impressions (you get the idea).

 

Does this help?

 

Jon

 

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Eric (Google Employee)
September 2015

Re: Question About Key Word Status

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Was the keyword new to your account?

 

Is the account itself new?

 

There are times that Google seems to have a difficult time calculating quality score or when it seems that the keywords historical Quality Score seems somewhat bad from other advertisers use of the keywords in their accounts.  As in when your account is new Google has not history on your account and the QS assigned will be determined by the relevance in your account, historical QS as well as other factors (some of which we don't even know about Smiley Happy

 

So when you know you have done all you can to build the relevance you need to look at raising the bids to improve the ad rank.

 

Ad Rank = Quality Score X Max CPC 



Kim Clink, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Clink Digital Marketing
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the 'Best Answer.'

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Eric (Google Employee)
September 2015

Re: Question About Key Word Status

Participant ✭ ☆ ☆
# 6
Participant ✭ ☆ ☆

Hello Ohiorick,

 

As you asked, how i can find match type of keywords, In order to find this click on Keyword tab and then see your keywords, if your keywords are in broad match they will look like as, This is keyword, if your keyword is in Phrase match then keyword look like "This is keyword", and if keywords are in exact match then they will look like [This is keyword].

 

In order to change the status of keyword, click on keyword and then click on yes i understand and then select match for keyword.

Dinesh
My Blog

View solution in original post

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Solution
Accepted by topic author ohiorick
September 2015

Re: Question About Key Word Status

Top Contributor
# 7
Top Contributor

Hi ohiorick, hopefully Dinesh's reply will allow you to look at your keyword match types.  This is an important aspect and I strongly suspect, given your reply, that you'll find they're all "broad" matches (i.e. no quotes, no brackets).  As I mentioned in my previous post, with broad matches, there's a good chance many of the search terms triggering your ad(s) won't be that relevant to "stone ground grits".

 

CTR (click-through-rate) is a measure of how often your ad is clicked against how often it is shown.  So, for example, if your ad is shown 100 times and is clicked 10 times, that's a CTR of 10%.  CTR is a very important metric in Adwords.  It is a good indication of how relevant and "appealing" your ad is when shown to search users.  Generally speaking, any Adwords user should always be trying to increase their CTR.  There are no hard and fast guidelines for what is a "good" CTR - some products/services naturally lend themselves to higher figures while others will be lower no matter what you do - but I think 5% should be a minimum aim in most cases.

 

As for ad copy... writing good ads within the character limits is indeed a skill, but it is possible.  The help centre has a whole section on improving ads; start from here:

 

http://support.google.com/adwords/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=145991&topic=21836&path=&ctx=leftnav

 

Click on the various headings in the left column to see the tips.

 

As for your current settings, they're probably OK for now, although I may be a little concerned about having no CPC limit when there may be other problems in the account.  In your current situation, I'd be looking initially to focus on the keywords themselves, changing their match types to phrase or modified broad to improve the relevance when ads are shown.

 

There's more info on match types here:

 

http://support.google.com/adwords/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=6100

 

Adwords is complicated and I would advise that you be cautious with your daily spend until you gain a little more understanding of some of those complexities.

 

Jon

 

 

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Eric (Google Employee)
September 2015

Re: Question About Key Word Status

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi ohiorick, beleive me, you're not alone being confused by the Quality Score system.  It can be very hard to track down what the exact problem is especially, as in your case, where you're seeing "No problems" across the board.

 

Can I ask what match type you're using for your keywords?  As I'm sure you've read, relevance is an important factor in QS but while it may seem that "stone ground grits" is highly relevant to your site, it depends on the match type.  If you're using stone ground grits as a broad match type, your ads could be triggered for any one of those three words, so could trigger on "stone roses", or "ground zero", for example, which obviously have a low relevance.

 

Historical CTR (click-through-rate) is also important.  You don't mention what your CTR rates are but if they're "lowish" (say less than 5%), this could be a factor and indicate that your ad copy (text) could be improved.

 

You've also left out the bit about "your bid".  It may be that your bid is too low and this is having a "knock-on" effect on other factors.  For example, if your bid means your ad is appearing in a low position, it'll get fewer impressions, lower CTR, which means it has a poorer quality score which means it gets a lower position which means it gets fewer impressions (you get the idea).

 

Does this help?

 

Jon

 

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Eric (Google Employee)
September 2015

Re: Question About Key Word Status

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Was the keyword new to your account?

 

Is the account itself new?

 

There are times that Google seems to have a difficult time calculating quality score or when it seems that the keywords historical Quality Score seems somewhat bad from other advertisers use of the keywords in their accounts.  As in when your account is new Google has not history on your account and the QS assigned will be determined by the relevance in your account, historical QS as well as other factors (some of which we don't even know about Smiley Happy

 

So when you know you have done all you can to build the relevance you need to look at raising the bids to improve the ad rank.

 

Ad Rank = Quality Score X Max CPC 



Kim Clink, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Clink Digital Marketing
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the 'Best Answer.'

Re: Question About Key Word Status

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Wow...this is complicated!

 

OK, here are some additional questions (and if there are other sources that answer these questions, let me know):

 

"Can I ask what match type you're using for your keywords?"

I haven't a clue.  How can I find this out?  How can I change it?

 

"Historical CTR (click-through-rate) is also important."

My CTR on all my keywords is <5%.  Highest is, like, 3.5% This is the first I've heard about this particular benchmark.

 

"...indicate that your ad copy (text) could be improved"

I hear you but I'm at a loss as to how to improve an ad that has ten words and each of them refer specifically to products on the site and to key words that I use.  Again...keyword = stone ground grits; ad title = stone ground grits; landing page = stone ground grits.  QS....low.  I'm obviously missing something.

 

"It may be that your bid is too low and this is having a "knock-on" effect on other factors.
Here's my bid option: Focus on clicks, automatic bidding, no CPC bid limit.  I assumed this meant Google Ads was bidding whatever was needed to get me where I needed to be.  Should I change it?

Re: Question About Key Word Status

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Was the keyword new to your account?

Nope.

 

Is the account itself new?

Nope.

 

That said...today I made some changes to my ads and added some new ones.  But the questions I have pertain to former ads that ran for several months.

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Eric (Google Employee)
September 2015

Re: Question About Key Word Status

Participant ✭ ☆ ☆
# 6
Participant ✭ ☆ ☆

Hello Ohiorick,

 

As you asked, how i can find match type of keywords, In order to find this click on Keyword tab and then see your keywords, if your keywords are in broad match they will look like as, This is keyword, if your keyword is in Phrase match then keyword look like "This is keyword", and if keywords are in exact match then they will look like [This is keyword].

 

In order to change the status of keyword, click on keyword and then click on yes i understand and then select match for keyword.

Dinesh
My Blog
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author ohiorick
September 2015

Re: Question About Key Word Status

Top Contributor
# 7
Top Contributor

Hi ohiorick, hopefully Dinesh's reply will allow you to look at your keyword match types.  This is an important aspect and I strongly suspect, given your reply, that you'll find they're all "broad" matches (i.e. no quotes, no brackets).  As I mentioned in my previous post, with broad matches, there's a good chance many of the search terms triggering your ad(s) won't be that relevant to "stone ground grits".

 

CTR (click-through-rate) is a measure of how often your ad is clicked against how often it is shown.  So, for example, if your ad is shown 100 times and is clicked 10 times, that's a CTR of 10%.  CTR is a very important metric in Adwords.  It is a good indication of how relevant and "appealing" your ad is when shown to search users.  Generally speaking, any Adwords user should always be trying to increase their CTR.  There are no hard and fast guidelines for what is a "good" CTR - some products/services naturally lend themselves to higher figures while others will be lower no matter what you do - but I think 5% should be a minimum aim in most cases.

 

As for ad copy... writing good ads within the character limits is indeed a skill, but it is possible.  The help centre has a whole section on improving ads; start from here:

 

http://support.google.com/adwords/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=145991&topic=21836&path=&ctx=leftnav

 

Click on the various headings in the left column to see the tips.

 

As for your current settings, they're probably OK for now, although I may be a little concerned about having no CPC limit when there may be other problems in the account.  In your current situation, I'd be looking initially to focus on the keywords themselves, changing their match types to phrase or modified broad to improve the relevance when ads are shown.

 

There's more info on match types here:

 

http://support.google.com/adwords/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=6100

 

Adwords is complicated and I would advise that you be cautious with your daily spend until you gain a little more understanding of some of those complexities.

 

Jon

 

 

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits