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Plural form of keywords in exact matches

Badged Google Partner
# 1
Badged Google Partner

Hello, I'm new to adwords and just starting a new campaign with focus on conversions.

I've read the whole guide to google adwords certification, but I want to ask just to be sure.

I know that even in exact match it doesn't matter whether user search for plural form(f.e.Smiley Tongueerfumes) and your add should pop up eventhough you only have singular form of that word(f.e.Smiley Tongueerfume).

But I want to ask if there is any slight advantage if I add both words singular + plural in my keywords list?

I mean like for better match?

or will I have equal score with someone who has both versions against me having only singular version?

 

Thanks in advance

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Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by topic author Tomáš Kraus
September 2015

Re: Plural form of keywords in exact matches

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi Alex, great question.

 

If you want to test plural (and other) variations then the best way is really to switch off the "close variants" setting in the Campaign settings.  Although there's no reason why you shouldn't add [perfume] and [perfumes] to the same Ad Group, there's no guarantee that the results will be based only upon the users actual search.  When faced with two (or more) possible keyword matches for a search term AdWords will pick the "best" one; usually this is the one that most closely matches the term, but there are other factors (see here: https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2756257?hl=en ) so it's possible that a search term using the singular might match to the plural and vice-versa.  If you turn off close variants, in theory, you should see a more realistic picture of the difference between the two.

 

Alternatively, if you've got a decent number of clicks, you could just examine the Search Detail report for the keyword(s) to see what the most common search terms are (and you can filter this list to look specifically for words) and then decide which to use, and how to write your Ads, based upon that.

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Tomáš Kraus
September 2015

Re: Plural form of keywords in exact matches

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi Alex, great question.

 

If you want to test plural (and other) variations then the best way is really to switch off the "close variants" setting in the Campaign settings.  Although there's no reason why you shouldn't add [perfume] and [perfumes] to the same Ad Group, there's no guarantee that the results will be based only upon the users actual search.  When faced with two (or more) possible keyword matches for a search term AdWords will pick the "best" one; usually this is the one that most closely matches the term, but there are other factors (see here: https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2756257?hl=en ) so it's possible that a search term using the singular might match to the plural and vice-versa.  If you turn off close variants, in theory, you should see a more realistic picture of the difference between the two.

 

Alternatively, if you've got a decent number of clicks, you could just examine the Search Detail report for the keyword(s) to see what the most common search terms are (and you can filter this list to look specifically for words) and then decide which to use, and how to write your Ads, based upon that.

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

Re: Plural form of keywords in exact matches

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

A rule of thumb I use is that  if a keyword has a high CTR, I break it down to its variants, to see which variant would perform better.

 

 

This is not an "error free" approach, since as Jon (@Jon_Gritton) mentioned, the decision (by the system)  "which keyword would trigger the ad, if more than one keyword matches the search query" (see Jon's link) is complex, and cannot be controlled.  ( And the system might match "the other variant"  to trigger the ad.)

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Re: Plural form of keywords in exact matches

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor
Hi Alex,

Quite often, the difference between singular and plural queries can indicate search intent. Singular usually indicates research while plural indicates purchase intent. It's different for each market. The best way to find out is to test the two.

Best of Luck!

Pete
petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

Re: Plural form of keywords in exact matches

Badged Google Partner
# 5
Badged Google Partner
Thanks. Your answers were very informational.