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Optimizing Adwords: The Traditional Way vs The New Way

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# 1
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Hi folks,

 

http://visual.ly/optimizing-adwords-traditional-way-vs-new-way

 

I stumble upon this infographic online which analyzed the old and new ways of AdWords campaign structuring.

 

What I'm really curious to find our or listen to you guys' opinions is the Campaigns & Ad Groups structuring portions. Does it really better in that way?

 

Let's open for discussion.

 

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Accepted by topic author eric w
September 2015

Re: Optimizing Adwords: The Traditional Way vs The New Way

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# 3
Top Contributor
What I found was a reference to keywords instead of search terms, in the first part of the infographic.

But I find Finch's approach correct, though I did not have the time and resources to implement their elaborate structure.

I did though split products at ad group level and did bid, at ad group level, in relationship to the margin per sale for each product.

However, like I said, I did not go to Ad Group - One Keyword structure. They can do it, however, because as soon as a sound naming convention is in place, and their system can identify everything, from keyword to search term, ad and ad group, the rest is logic & calculations. If they see that a keyword does not meet its KPI (cost/margin relationship, margin being pulled from the site owner's inventory), they bid it down. If it performs well, and the impression share is not yet 100%, they can bid it up, and so on.

That structure is great IF you use automation. If you don't, well, you'll quickly get swamped. I think I'm pretty savvy not just with Excel but also with SQL and databases and some scripting languages, yet I would not attempt to manage a 1000 SKUs inventory split at that level, because I would not be able to react soon / often enough. But if the system's in place, I can clearly see it working very well.
Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
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Re: Optimizing Adwords: The Traditional Way vs The New Way

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Well... there are so many mistakes on this infographic, I wouldn't even bother to correct, and just skip it....
My recommendation : Don't use it to explain the principles of AdWords . (I prefer not copy/ paste the mistakes to this discussion - not to mislead users...)

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author eric w
September 2015

Re: Optimizing Adwords: The Traditional Way vs The New Way

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor
What I found was a reference to keywords instead of search terms, in the first part of the infographic.

But I find Finch's approach correct, though I did not have the time and resources to implement their elaborate structure.

I did though split products at ad group level and did bid, at ad group level, in relationship to the margin per sale for each product.

However, like I said, I did not go to Ad Group - One Keyword structure. They can do it, however, because as soon as a sound naming convention is in place, and their system can identify everything, from keyword to search term, ad and ad group, the rest is logic & calculations. If they see that a keyword does not meet its KPI (cost/margin relationship, margin being pulled from the site owner's inventory), they bid it down. If it performs well, and the impression share is not yet 100%, they can bid it up, and so on.

That structure is great IF you use automation. If you don't, well, you'll quickly get swamped. I think I'm pretty savvy not just with Excel but also with SQL and databases and some scripting languages, yet I would not attempt to manage a 1000 SKUs inventory split at that level, because I would not be able to react soon / often enough. But if the system's in place, I can clearly see it working very well.
Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’ Learn how here.