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Multiple phrases in one keyword slot

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# 1
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Can a single keyword slot be used to require two phrases (or more) to be matched to trigger an ad presentation?  Such as:

 

"Mexican food" "fish taco"

 

Where other words before, in-between, or after these phrases in the original search would be allowed just as for a single phrase keyword.  So in the above example, the following would match:

 

Looking for Mexican food especially a good fish taco.

 

If "Mexican food" "fish taco" is not allowed in one keyword slot together, then how would one require such a desired composite match?  It seems the only option would be a modified broad search such as:

 

+Mexican +food +fish +taco

 

but that approach loses the specificity of phrase searchs.  Is there a way to do this that I am not understanding?

 

Also, Google is advising the addition of newly enchance modified broad searches mid-May.  Are these in place yet?

 

Thanks in advance for any help!


 


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Accepted by RachelM (Google Employee)
September 2015

Re: Multiple phrases in one keyword slot

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hello.

 

I think you can even skip "food", and go for +mexican +fish +taco, because if you use +food as well, then that becomes a required term. And if someone already decided on a fish taco, a mexican one, there is a chance that they won't use "food" in their search query.

 

Also, you could try to use +fish +taco, and see if that's not profitable as well, given the fact that (as quoted by Wikipedia, because - sadly - I don't know much about tacos) taco is, traditionally, a Mexican dish.

 

With this approach you'll catch search terms such as "great fish taco", "best fish taco", "fish taco delivery", whatever.

 

Of course, you should keep an eye to the search terms you're attracting with these keywords, adjust your bids accordingly and use the right negative terms if you identify irrelevant search terms.

Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’ Learn how here.

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Re: Multiple phrases in one keyword slot

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi California_Tom,

 

Personally, I would say that regardless of the specificity of phrase match, your example +Mexican +food +fish +taco is quite specific and would be more than adequate to match your query example and similar variations.

 

The double phrase match is not available and I have not seen official word yet on when the switch is happening but you can opt-in/out now if you'd like on the settings tab on your account - at the bottom of the page.

 

-Tom

Tommy Sands, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by RachelM (Google Employee)
September 2015

Re: Multiple phrases in one keyword slot

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hello.

 

I think you can even skip "food", and go for +mexican +fish +taco, because if you use +food as well, then that becomes a required term. And if someone already decided on a fish taco, a mexican one, there is a chance that they won't use "food" in their search query.

 

Also, you could try to use +fish +taco, and see if that's not profitable as well, given the fact that (as quoted by Wikipedia, because - sadly - I don't know much about tacos) taco is, traditionally, a Mexican dish.

 

With this approach you'll catch search terms such as "great fish taco", "best fish taco", "fish taco delivery", whatever.

 

Of course, you should keep an eye to the search terms you're attracting with these keywords, adjust your bids accordingly and use the right negative terms if you identify irrelevant search terms.

Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’ Learn how here.