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Multiple match types vs just broad modified?

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Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi,

 

I believe I have received conflicting advice (from Googlers) re use of multiple match types in a single adgroup. 

 

 

1. One suggestion is to use multiple match types, eg broad mod, phrase, and exact. Other things (qual score, ad rank, etc.) being equal, Google matches the query in the order of exact match, then phrase, then broad mod. to display the ad.

 

2. 2nd suggestion is to start with broad mod only, as it will catch queries either way.

 

The first option makes sense to me. I figure that if my exact match keyword is the best match, Google will use that keyword instead of the broad mod and because it is a better match, the ad will display in higher postion at lower cost than if the adgroup only includes the broad mod.

 

This page seems to support option #1: https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2756257?hl=en&ref_topic=3119131 

 

How do you read it?

Appreciate your advice/experience. Thanks ahead,
gerry

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Accepted by topic author Gerry S
January 2016

Re: Multiple match types vs just broad modified?

Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆
# 6
Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆
@gerry S

1) No it does not. There are many good reasons why you would want to have different match types of the same keyword. Bid differentiation would be one. You may find it necessary to bid a certain amount for the exact match version, and then bid less for the broad match one. Duplicates literally means same keyword AND match type.

2) Yes, your SQR can be a good indicator on when this is necessary. You may find some keywords that are triggered by your BMM need to be exact because they need a higher bid to be competitive. You don't have to drop BMM from the adgroup. You may find that you want to move some these special exact match keywords to their own adgroup to make the ad copy as focused as possible. I'm going to go back to my previous post to illustrate. You know it's worth bidding $3.00 per click for +blue +widgets. This gets you a competitive ad position for most queries and the ROI is good. You see in the SQR you are getting an above average conversion rate for the exact query blue widgets for sale, but it's historical position is not the most competitive. Here you would want to isolate that query with [blue widgets for sale] and consider bidding higher on it to see if that gets you more clicks with the same conversion rate or better. For sale being in the query generally makes it more competitive because it signals purchase intent.

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Re: Multiple match types vs just broad modified?

Community Manager
# 2
Community Manager

Hi Gerry,

 

Thanks for posting to the Community! I would say that points 1 and 2 are speaking to entirely different questions: the first, about how Google matches a query to your keywords, and the second, about a possible strategy you could use when structuring your AdWords account.

 

As you found in the Help Center article you linked, all things being equal, the system will choose to match a query to the keyword which is closest to that query, or which is in the more exact match type. But strategy-wise, that does not mean you should necessarily put all match types of all of your keywords in your ad groups. I've worked with some advertisers who want to reach a large number of users, or who work in a niche market where the keywords are not obvious, and so they choose to use only broad match. I've worked with others who have limited budgets or highly-specific products and use only broad match modifier. The strategy depends entirely on you and your goals for the campaign.

 

If you're unsure which keywords to start with, running a handful of broad match keywords is a quick way to find the right ones. You can look through the search terms report, pick out the keywords that convert, and add those that are irrelevant as negatives. Keep in mind, though, that with this method, you may pay for a fair amount of irrelevant traffic.

 

If you're new to AdWords or need to stay within a strict budget, I would usually recommend starting with your keywords in broad match modifier. You can still get enough traffic to test, but will not pay for the searches that are completely unrelated to your business.

 

Hope this helps!
Cassie

Re: Multiple match types vs just broad modified?

Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆
# 3
Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆
Good advice from Cassie, but I would like to clear up one statement you made.
re: I figure that if my exact match keyword is the best match, Google will use that keyword instead of the broad mod and because it is a better match, the ad will display in higher postion at lower cost than if the adgroup only includes the broad mod.

That's not quite how it works. Google does not reward you for using one match type over another. Quality score is the factor that can reward you a higher position at a lower cost. Your position is determined by ad rank which is (Quality Score x Max CPC) Let's say you start with the kw +blue +widgets, bid $3.00 for it, and have a QS of 7. Your ad rank for any query that contains the words blue and widget will have an ad rank of 21 in all the auctions it enters. Lets say you decided to pause that and then add [blue widgets for sale]. You also bid $3.00 and have a QS of 7. Your ad rank is still 21, but only enters an auction for the specific query blue widgets for sale. Now here is the point to understand. Lets say QS for [blue widgets for sale] drops to a 4 for whatever reason, and +blue +widgets still has a 7. You are better off using +blue +widgets because it will have an ad rank of 21 for the query blue widgets for sale, where [blue widgets for sale] will only have an ad rank of 12. The QS of a broad match modified, regular broad match, and phrase match kws applies to every query it triggers.

I personally love BMM. It is what I prefer to start with.

Re: Multiple match types vs just broad modified?

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor
Hi Gerry,

Let me add this, Google will usually pick the more restrictive match type over the less restrictive match types, but not always. If all match types are in the same AdGroup, that is the normal behavior. Google also assumes you will bid the same or higher for the phrase and exact match phrases when they make this statement.

If you organize your AdGroups by match type, which many advertisers choose to do, you'll need a more effective strategy using negative keywords of the more restrictive match types in the less restrictive ad groups.

For example, in your BMM AdGroup, include negatives for phrase and exact match. In your phrase match group, include negatives for exact match. This gives you a little more control over your bids. You could, if you wanted, bid lower on the exact match this way and still get impressions.

Best of Luck!

Pete
petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

Re: Multiple match types vs just broad modified?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Thanks so much Pete, David, and Cassie!

Here is a corollary question: If Google says to avoid duplicate keywords in an adgroup, that implies avoiding use of same keyword with different match types in an adgroup, right?

Next question would be, I think: if you start with all BMM keywords, when and on what basis do you choose to use a phrase or exact match version of the same keywords? Is that based on survey of search terms? And if you use PM or EM, then you drop the BMM from the adgroup?

Pete - I'll have to think a bit more about the exclusion of PM or EM keywords

Thanks ahead - really appreciate the clarification.
gerry
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Gerry S
January 2016

Re: Multiple match types vs just broad modified?

Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆
# 6
Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆
@gerry S

1) No it does not. There are many good reasons why you would want to have different match types of the same keyword. Bid differentiation would be one. You may find it necessary to bid a certain amount for the exact match version, and then bid less for the broad match one. Duplicates literally means same keyword AND match type.

2) Yes, your SQR can be a good indicator on when this is necessary. You may find some keywords that are triggered by your BMM need to be exact because they need a higher bid to be competitive. You don't have to drop BMM from the adgroup. You may find that you want to move some these special exact match keywords to their own adgroup to make the ad copy as focused as possible. I'm going to go back to my previous post to illustrate. You know it's worth bidding $3.00 per click for +blue +widgets. This gets you a competitive ad position for most queries and the ROI is good. You see in the SQR you are getting an above average conversion rate for the exact query blue widgets for sale, but it's historical position is not the most competitive. Here you would want to isolate that query with [blue widgets for sale] and consider bidding higher on it to see if that gets you more clicks with the same conversion rate or better. For sale being in the query generally makes it more competitive because it signals purchase intent.

Re: Multiple match types vs just broad modified?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 7
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Again, I very much appreciate your input, David, Cassie and Pete. The devil is in the details, eh.