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Match types

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi,

 

I'm really hoping someone can help me with my situation.  I have set up a lot of new ad groups with very specific keywords in each one.  For example, one ad has as a headline 'cheap pregnancy tests', another 'buy pregnancy tests online'.  I have tried to put these as exact match.  The problem is that the ad containing my main keyword 'pregnancy test' overrides a lot of the other keywords from different ad groups (even if I put this ad exact match as well).

 

I feel like I've just wasted time creating these specific ads.

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 

Thanks

 

Jackie

1 Expert replyverified_user
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Jacqueline W
September 2015

Re: Match types

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi Jackie,

 

First, as you may know, it's not really the ads that are matched to user search queries, it's the keywords that you have in your ad groups.  Now, it's a great idea to have your ad copies be closely relevant to the keywords in that ad group and as well, lead to an equally relevant landing page. That's the fundamental idea behind a sound AdWords structure.

 

When using ad groups that contain keywords that could serve ads for the same search queries, you will need to use what is referred to as embedded negative keywords as the traffic lights in your campaigns to ensure that your ads will be served as you wish.

 

For instance, if you have an ad group that contains the following exact match keywords:

 

[cheap pregnancy tests]

[buy pregnancy tests online]

 

and another ad group that contains the broad and/or phrase match keyword

 

"pregnancy test"

 

A search for 'cheap pregnancy tests' could potentially match either ad group as you have this search query as an exact match in on ad group and it would also match your phrase match keyword in the other Ad group.

 

They way you can combat this is to add exact match negative keywords to the broad/phrase match ad group, essentially telling AdWords, "Hey, for these specific keywords, look elsewhere."

 

So you would have:

 

Ad group #1

 

[cheap pregnancy tests]

[buy pregnancy tests online]

 

No negatives needed here - these keywords can only match if the search query is exactly (or extremely close) to these keywords.

 

Ad Group #2

"pregnancy test"

 

Negatives

-[cheap pregnancy tests]

-[buy pregnancy tests online]

 

Now, you'll have to interpret this according to how your have your ad groups structured and which keywords and match types you've selected for the specific keywords.  

 

Does this help at all?

 

-Tommy

Tommy Sands, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Jacqueline W
September 2015

Re: Match types

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi Jackie,

 

First, as you may know, it's not really the ads that are matched to user search queries, it's the keywords that you have in your ad groups.  Now, it's a great idea to have your ad copies be closely relevant to the keywords in that ad group and as well, lead to an equally relevant landing page. That's the fundamental idea behind a sound AdWords structure.

 

When using ad groups that contain keywords that could serve ads for the same search queries, you will need to use what is referred to as embedded negative keywords as the traffic lights in your campaigns to ensure that your ads will be served as you wish.

 

For instance, if you have an ad group that contains the following exact match keywords:

 

[cheap pregnancy tests]

[buy pregnancy tests online]

 

and another ad group that contains the broad and/or phrase match keyword

 

"pregnancy test"

 

A search for 'cheap pregnancy tests' could potentially match either ad group as you have this search query as an exact match in on ad group and it would also match your phrase match keyword in the other Ad group.

 

They way you can combat this is to add exact match negative keywords to the broad/phrase match ad group, essentially telling AdWords, "Hey, for these specific keywords, look elsewhere."

 

So you would have:

 

Ad group #1

 

[cheap pregnancy tests]

[buy pregnancy tests online]

 

No negatives needed here - these keywords can only match if the search query is exactly (or extremely close) to these keywords.

 

Ad Group #2

"pregnancy test"

 

Negatives

-[cheap pregnancy tests]

-[buy pregnancy tests online]

 

Now, you'll have to interpret this according to how your have your ad groups structured and which keywords and match types you've selected for the specific keywords.  

 

Does this help at all?

 

-Tommy

Tommy Sands, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’

Re: Match types

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Hi Tommy,

Thank you so much for your reply. It sounds sensible so I'll give it a go Smiley Happy I was on live chat to an Adwords advisor for about an hour a couple of days ago. His solution in the end - just put one ad for pregnancy with one broad match modifier keyword 'pregnancy test'. I knew this goes against everything that's recommended!

I'll let you know how I get on.

Thanks again

Jackie

Re: Match types

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Hi Tommy

Just to let you know your advice worked! Thank you once again Smiley Happy

Jackie

Re: Match types

Top Contributor
# 5
Top Contributor
My Pleasure! Glad to help! Smiley Happy

-Tommy
Tommy Sands, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’