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Location targeting and best practices? Am I doing it wrong?

Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
# 1
Follower ✭ ☆ ☆

Hi there,

 

I am creating campaigns based on small town areas within one big county area. 

 

In the campaign settings, I have selected the whole county to target. Which is what I want to do.

 

Then at ad group level, I have town adgroups, many with the same keywords, because it is the same service for all towns. Will these keywords compete with each other? Or will they just be triggered by the ad, in which the town is specified.

 

Another thing I noticed, is when I type I specific phrase into google, my ad for another county appears, which is obviously costing me money but not relevant!? For example if I type "Kerry cheap skip hire" into google, the results show my ad for another area I am targeting in a different county - Waterford, but I have selected to target Waterford for this ad. Why would the ad display if I am searching a different county? Smiley Sad

 

I appreciate any feedback on this?

 

Thanks.

1 Expert replyverified_user

Re: Location targeting and best practices? Am I doing it wrong?

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi @Kelly C,

 

It's an interesting question Smiley Happy

 

Your current structure can work, I'd just be careful with regards to which match type you're using for your keywords. If you use phrase and / or exact then you'll minimise the chance of overlap and irrelevance. The only issue is that you then might miss out on other search terms which could be beneficial for your business; although this can be combated by performing more keyword research.

 

If you can spare the time and effort, I would suggest a different structure which could significantly improve your results. That would be to create a campaign for each town, with the location targeting set on that particular town while also excluding all neighbouring towns. This way you don't have to rely on mentioning the town name in your keyword variations, nor do you have to run the risk of missing out on traffic due to restrictive keyword match types. It probably sounds like a mammoth task (depending on how many town you are targeting) but AdWords Editor can reduce this significantly with some quick copy, paste and replace work. 


ScottyD, AdWords Top Contributor
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Location targeting and best practices? Am I doing it wrong?

Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
# 3
Follower ✭ ☆ ☆

Hi ScottyD,

 

Great thanks for the suggestion, I might just have to do that - a big task but doable. 

 

Another question - why is my ad firing when I google another unrelated county, and I have excluded this county in my targeting? It seems strange - if I am excluding it, it should only fire when the correct county keyword is searched...

 

Thanks.

Location targeting and best practices? Am I doing it wrong?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi Kelly,

If you have exactly the same keywords combinations in each adgroups, there is chance indeed that these adgroups compete against each other. Is your structure like:
Adgroup-city1: keywords =
"+service1 +offer1"

"+service1 +offer2"

Adgroup-city2: keywords =

"+service1 +offer1"

"+service1 +offer2"

 

When yes, I would suggest that you make your structure more granular, like:

Adgroup-city1: keywords =
"+service1 +offer1 +city1"

"+service1 +offer2 +city1"

Adgroup-city2: keywords =

"+service1 +offer1 +city2"

"+service1 +offer2 +city2"

 

Like this you'll make sure that only the matching combinations will show the right ad.

Regarding the targeting: if I'm not mistaking it sounds normal that it still shows your ads as you're still based in your targeted location when doing the search and as you're not excluding the input keyword from your adgroup (but just targeting geographically the user). Location targeting is based on the user-based-location and not the input keywords (if I'm not mistaking).

 

That's why, for your need of precised location targeting you could also work with shared negative lists: excluding all locations that are out of our target. And of course have a regular close look at the search term reports in order to add new ones to your adgroups or to add excluding ones to your negative list.


You also have to be aware that the location targeting isn't 100% reliable as it may also vary depending on the server location, IP adresses etc.

Hope this helps!

Location targeting and best practices? Am I doing it wrong?

Follower ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Follower ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi @Kelly C,

I agree with @ScottyD regarding campaigns for each town. If you use AdWords Editor to make changes to your account, you might find it faster and easier to make the changes.

Location targeting and best practices? Am I doing it wrong?

Badged Google Partner
# 6
Badged Google Partner

There is no such thing as "internal competition" within an AdWords account. Only one ad can be shown per account, per impression instance. The ad with the highest adrank wins the ad slot.

 

I wouldn't use this sort of structure because - Location targeting is not perfect, and the end user query is what actually matters, not the KW's you add to the account. If you are the only person who ever actually searches for these terms, then building a huge structure so you see the right thing is a complete waste of time. If none of your customers actually search for those terms, you are just building out a huge structure of KW's that will never trigger an ad to show due to low search volume.

 

If you have any history at all, then - Run your search terms report for all campaigns/keywords, all time. What is the top impression generating search query? Or, if you have a conversion strategy in place, what is your all time best converting / most profitable search query? That term, in it's broadest form will give you more bang for the buck, with less structure, than following "best practices" and building out a huge structure based on estimates from the KW tool, or personal assumptions.

 

What do you do when the end user doesn't qualify the query beyond the root term "skip hire"? Or, as is occurring more and more lately, how do you identify the "correct" location ad to show a user who searches for "skip hire near me"? If/when a particular location variant has enough volume and value to warrant it's own adgroup, then create that adgroup, and test more relevant ad copy against your control ad. In many cases, an engaging "generic" ad that focuses on your core UVP landing on the home page is the most profitable, valuable ad.

 

Sometimes, less can be much, much more. One of the biggest mistakes you can make with AdWords is assuming anything. With PPC, you have access to all the data. Why assume, when the data allows you to know for certain? Smiley Happy

Tom

Location targeting and best practices? Am I doing it wrong?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 7
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi all,

When I was speaking of "internal competition" I meant that in having the same keywords in different campaigns without using negatives and exclusions, then you let Google choose which campaign would be the most adapted (probably the most profitable to Google, not always to you) and you don't keep the control on the ads displayed.

 

Regarding the granular structure strategy: it's of course a need to use Search term reports. But you have to have the right short-tail keywords at the beginning too. If your ads don't show, you won't get any search term report.


I've just seen an article posted on this topic, in case it can help:
http://searchengineland.com/effectively-segment-accounts-multiple-locations-279861

Raphaël