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Language targeting

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi, I'm setting up a new text campaign, and although my Ads (and website) is in English, I consider that my potential clients are not only native English (say UK or US) but people with good English level but with other languages as primary language that use in their interfaces (such as Italian, Dutch, German, Russian and French for instance). 

Do you reckon it is all right to select all those languages appart form English in the "Language targeting" settings?

 

Thanks. 

 

Similar experiences of this topic would be appreciated!

2 Expert replyverified_user

Re: Language targeting

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi Maria, great question.  As with all things AdWords, the answer is a combination of "it depends" and "you'll need to experiment".  Targeting Ads in English at people who have specifically set their language preference to something else may work - as you say, there are plenty of people out there for whom English as a second language is better than some Englsih friends I have - but it will inevitably mean you'll be targeting some percentage of people who can't speak English at all.  If you consider that CTR is the most important factor in Quality Score, and Quality Score directly affects costs, if you're showing English Ads to any non-English speakers you're effectively throwing those Ad impressions away and damaging your CTR.

 

Is your website multi-lingual?

 

Jon

 

 

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

Re: Language targeting

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Thanks Jon for your reply. But no, my website is in English. Any experience in this before?

Maria

Re: Language targeting

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

Hello Maria;

I live in a "multi-lingual" country. Many, though fluent with the major (local)  language spoken, prefer to set their "browser language setting"  (the main method Google uses to determine the user language), to one of the other 4 major languages spoken. (Their native language.)

 

For me, this is a "standard procedure" to set Adwords language targeting  to more than one language, assuming that users in the targeted location - though prefer the browser UI to be in their mother tongue - are also fluent in the local language. (English in your case.)

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Re: Language targeting

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Hello Moshe,

Thank you for your help.
I was just wanted to ask you two more questions related to your experience in Language targeting.
1) I'd like to know if most of your target, even preferring to set up the browser in their local language are fluent or bilingual in the language of your ads. Because in my case, in Italy or Germany for example, not all the people are fluent in English, but I want to target at least the ones that are fluent.
And 2nd) Do you think that it can affect negatively to your Quality score, if the CTR is lower in this case?
Any feed-back or tips with your experience would be appreciated! Thanks

Re: Language targeting

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor

Hello again;

Jon "touched" on that in his answer:

I would say the following:

If this is a technical product / service -  most likely that the English level of the users is good enough.

If this is a consumer product / service - I would set a dedicated landing page for each language (as Jon suggested).

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’

Re: Language targeting

Badged Google Partner
# 7
Badged Google Partner
Unless you have some kind of translate function on the site, I would hesitate to use ads/language targeting other than the language on site. CTR and QS are great, but if all of those ESL visitors abandon the site, a 100% bounce rate before the conversion action won't make you any money. Clicks cost money, conversions make money. If they can't/won't convert due to the language barrier, how do you justify the costs?

What kind of analytics data do you have? If there is no data to verify the theory, then it's all just speculation and assumptions. Check your audience > Geo > Language reports and see if you are getting any valuable traffic from those other languages as is. If not, then fix that problem first (language translation) before you spend your budget targeting users who won't/don't currently convert.
Tom