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Keywords

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I've been told to put " " speechmarks around my keywords and negative keywords.

What is the purpose of this ?

2 Expert replyverified_user

Re: Keywords

Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
# 2
Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
adding these means you have you keywords on phrase match which means If you have a keyword like

"Online courses" with this quotations on it

any search include Online courses in it in the same order your ads will appear so you target greater number of audience

but lets say you don't want people who search for Free online courses then you add

-Free as a negative keywords so if anyone search for Free courses your ads doesn't come up


I hope that was helpful you can also read this for more details on different match types

https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2497836?hl=en
Maged Wassef
Adwords Guru and a Mini Genius I Follow @TopRankGuru
Please Star My reply If it helped you Smiley Very Happy

Re: Keywords

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hi Suzanne, as Maged has said, speech marks (") define a Phrase Match for a Keyword.  Phrase matches require that search terms entered match the Keyword with the same words in the same order, but not necessarily limited to just those words.  For example a Phrase Match of "red shoes" would match against:

 

red shoes

cheap red shoes

red shoes for dancing

 

but not against

 

red ballet shoes

shoes matching red dress

 

Does this help?  You might find it useful to read up on Keyword Match Types...


Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

Re: Keywords

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Thanks for your helpful response.

 

1) So can you confirm that the difference between "red shoes" and [red shoes] is that

"red shoes" will be found in a phrase such as   cheap red shoes   or  red shoes for kids, but not  red shiny shoes

and

[red shoes] will only find the exact match red shoes

 

2) Can you also help clarify will keyword "red shoes" also be matched by red shoe  whereas [red shoes] won't be matched by keyword red shoe  ?

 

3) Also if I don't want people to find my ad if they type keyword eg   red shoes in Wigan (and lots of other towns)   What's the best way to identify this? Do I put   -Wigan   or "wigan"   in my Negative Keyword list?

 

Sorry I am a bit slow on this but find it confusing.  NB the wigan problem is a recurring one for me even though I have a Targetted Location Radius set to 30 miles of our office.  

 

Thanks for your help - very much appreciated!

 

Re: Keywords

Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
# 5
Follower ✭ ✭ ☆

Hi Suzanne,

 

1) Yeah the keyword "red shoes" will find phrases containing red shoes and [red shoes] will only find searches for that exact term. 

 

2) [red shoe] should match a search for red shoe as an exact match (close variant). This takes into account very slight differences in spelling (such as singular instead of plural).

 

3) I think the better way would be to add "Wigan" as a phrase match negative keyword. This should stop your ads being triggered for any search containing the word Wigan.

 

If someone within your radius is searching for red shoes in wigan your ads may still show to them since they are within 30 miles of your office. 

 

Best of luck with your campaign!

Re: Keywords

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 6
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Thanks for the help but I'm not sure where I put
-Free ?
Is -Free the same same as if I put the word "free" in my Negative Keyword list?

Re: Keywords

Top Contributor
# 7
Top Contributor

Hi Suzanne,

 

You don't use the negative in AdWords - only in Google search.  In AdWords, as you've said, you'd just add the word free on its own to the Negative Keyword list.

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

Re: Keywords

Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
# 8
Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
hello, dear sir, I also have question, can you help me?it is very grateful if you can chat with me online. thank you!

Re: Keywords

Community Manager
# 9
Community Manager
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