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Keywords best practices

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I am optimizing keywords and I have a question regarding redundant keywords.

 

I've seen success with phrase and exact keywords:

 

1) new jeep specials

2) new jeep special

 

A) new jeep dealer

B) new jeep dealers

 

Would it be impactful to have 'new jeep special' as a modified broad keyword instead of 1 & 2 referenced above as phrase /exact keywords?

 

I was working on improving impression share and pacing our monthly spend more effectively so I've eliminated many broad match keywords.

 

When/How does Google pick up on variations of words? (Dealer/Dealers/Dealership). Do you need to just use the longest/most intricate variation of the word?

 

Any insight is greatly appreciated.  Thank you!

 

 

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Accepted by topic author Dylan b
March

Keywords best practices

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi @Dylan B,

 

You will get a broader reach from the +new +jeep +specials than you would from the phrase "new jeep specials" and/or from the exact [new jeep specials] match. Those 3 match type keywords will have a different search universe and potentially a different CTR and CPC. Typically you should see more budget going to the BMM versus Phrase versus Exact.

 

Your impression share might get limited pretty quickly with the BMM match type. Also, remember to check the search terms for the BMM keywords frequently. Those can get matched with the least related terms, or you may pick up some good negatives from there.

 

As to how Google matches the variations and plurals, here is a bit more info in detail: https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2497836?hl=en.

 

To answer your question about using the longest-tail keywords, that depends on your objective. If you are looking for conversions, then I would optimize for the Conversion Cost as long as a keyword of any match is converting, and I would pause any keyword match that is not converting. If you care about the reach and CTR, then any keyword match is good as long as the CTR is good.

 

Hope this helps,

-Julia


Julia Muller,
AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the 'Best Answer.’ Learn how here.

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Dylan b
March

Keywords best practices

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi @Dylan B,

 

You will get a broader reach from the +new +jeep +specials than you would from the phrase "new jeep specials" and/or from the exact [new jeep specials] match. Those 3 match type keywords will have a different search universe and potentially a different CTR and CPC. Typically you should see more budget going to the BMM versus Phrase versus Exact.

 

Your impression share might get limited pretty quickly with the BMM match type. Also, remember to check the search terms for the BMM keywords frequently. Those can get matched with the least related terms, or you may pick up some good negatives from there.

 

As to how Google matches the variations and plurals, here is a bit more info in detail: https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2497836?hl=en.

 

To answer your question about using the longest-tail keywords, that depends on your objective. If you are looking for conversions, then I would optimize for the Conversion Cost as long as a keyword of any match is converting, and I would pause any keyword match that is not converting. If you care about the reach and CTR, then any keyword match is good as long as the CTR is good.

 

Hope this helps,

-Julia


Julia Muller,
AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the 'Best Answer.’ Learn how here.

Keywords best practices

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

If you use the Keyword Planner it can change what you enter if it considers it a variant, to the main keyword in the results. Otherwise, there's no way of knowing whether a keyword is meaningful on its own, or not, in Google's eyes.

 

It would be a great feature - redundant keyword check - for a future AdWords.

 

Keywords best practices

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

 I would choose 1

Keywords best practices

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Thank you for the thorough response, @Julia_Muller

 

If spend is limited, would you use both terms phrase and exact while excluding the BMM query that may cover both?  

Re: Keywords best practices

Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
# 6
Follower ✭ ✭ ☆

@RobSkelton - it already exists as a Notification/Recommendation:

 

 

Screen Shot 2018-03-14 at 11.43.55 AM.pngScreen Shot 2018-03-14 at 11.43.04 AM.png

 

 

 

 

Keywords best practices

Top Contributor
# 7
Top Contributor

No problem @Dylan B,

 

I think you might find a little more control over the search queries your ads will show for with the phrase and exact versions of the keyword as opposed to the BMM, unless your negatives are super tight and continuously updated. But running the BMM is useful for mining the search queries for the new keywords. So if you can pull that off within the budget and not dilute your impression share too low, I'd do all 3 for some time until it was clear that BMM isn't the right fit. I'd leave those two and try running the BMM as well.

 

 

Hope this helps,

-Julia


Julia Muller,
AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the 'Best Answer.’ Learn how here.

Keywords best practices

Top Contributor
# 8
Top Contributor

Also, you don't need to exclude the BMM keyword, just pause it (or delete). 

 

If the budget is super limited, I would default to phrase and/or exact as long as your KPIs (CPA, CTR, Impr. Share.. KPIs may vary by advertiser or by campaign) are on target.

 

-Julia


Julia Muller,
AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the 'Best Answer.’ Learn how here.