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Keyword Research for New Accounts

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

When starting a new account and creating first campaigns in AdWords for a client should a keyword list be pretty extensive or basic?

Another questions (complementary to the first one) is how do you determine which match types to put your keywords in?

If I put all my keywords in a broad match then I guess I would gain the most information from search queries.

If I put them in phrase match then I will still gain information neccesarry to improve my account but it will be more specific.

I have never started an account with exact match keywords. 

 

Lastly, what is you opinion of having the same keyword in all three match types?

Example:

Ad group: used cars

Keywords: used cars, "used cars", [used cars]

 

Thank you!

N

 

 

1 Expert replyverified_user
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Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by topic author nisic
September 2015

Re: Keyword Research for New Accounts

Participant ✭ ☆ ☆
# 2
Participant ✭ ☆ ☆

Don't forget about the broad match modifier.  In your example, you could include these keywords to start with in an ad group:

 

[used cars]

+used +cars

 

Set a higher bid for the exact match since you know precisely what you're paying for.  Use the modified broad match to explore other possible search queries.  Refine as you go, either adding negatives or introducing new exact matches.  The modified broad match is a pretty good compromise between traditional (expanded) broad match and phrase match.  This is kind of a hybrid approach, but I suspect you'll find everyone has a different approach.

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Accepted by topic author nisic
September 2015

Re: Keyword Research for New Accounts

Rising Star
# 3
Rising Star

The answer to most of this is, "it depends."  

 

Different account managers--different approaches. Different goals-different strategies.

 

In general, I would say that new advertisers err on the side of too many keywords. They can't manage the resulting data and become overwhelmed with the flood of information. I think it's best to start with a smaller campaign--fewer keywords and just those that seem to have the highest probability of success--and then expand. Better 100 really good keywords than 1,000 keywords and a nervous breakdown. Woman Very Happy

 

I use a lot of Exat match, quite a bit of Phrase match, and some modified broad match for discovery. I almost never use traditional Broad match.. It simply pulls too wide a range of searches.

 

Occasionally, when a client's new account isn't pulling much traffic, I experiment some some broad match to see what the traffic looks like, yes, but I never start a campaign with all broad match. It's a way to gather data quickly, yes, and if you're not inclined to use the Keyword tools to help you find good keywords, then that's absolutely one tactic you could use. (I'm hesitant, yes. Most of the traffic your campaign gets while using Broad match is not going to result in clicks. This means Broad match won't help you beef up one of the most important campaign pieces--your negative keyword list.) If you decide to try it, I would suggest you gather your data quickly and move to start shutting down the Broad match keywords as soon as you can--before all of those inappropriate searches damage your account's quality metrics.

 

Yes, I agree that Phrase match would likely be a better option. As long as you start with high probability phrases, you're giong to find most of your additional keywords that way.

 

As far as match types and how to organize them--again, there are as many opinions on that as there are people with AdWords campaigns. For me--again, it just depends on the client's industry.

 


Theresa
Google AdWords Top Contributor
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author nisic
September 2015

Re: Keyword Research for New Accounts

Participant ✭ ☆ ☆
# 2
Participant ✭ ☆ ☆

Don't forget about the broad match modifier.  In your example, you could include these keywords to start with in an ad group:

 

[used cars]

+used +cars

 

Set a higher bid for the exact match since you know precisely what you're paying for.  Use the modified broad match to explore other possible search queries.  Refine as you go, either adding negatives or introducing new exact matches.  The modified broad match is a pretty good compromise between traditional (expanded) broad match and phrase match.  This is kind of a hybrid approach, but I suspect you'll find everyone has a different approach.

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author nisic
September 2015

Re: Keyword Research for New Accounts

Rising Star
# 3
Rising Star

The answer to most of this is, "it depends."  

 

Different account managers--different approaches. Different goals-different strategies.

 

In general, I would say that new advertisers err on the side of too many keywords. They can't manage the resulting data and become overwhelmed with the flood of information. I think it's best to start with a smaller campaign--fewer keywords and just those that seem to have the highest probability of success--and then expand. Better 100 really good keywords than 1,000 keywords and a nervous breakdown. Woman Very Happy

 

I use a lot of Exat match, quite a bit of Phrase match, and some modified broad match for discovery. I almost never use traditional Broad match.. It simply pulls too wide a range of searches.

 

Occasionally, when a client's new account isn't pulling much traffic, I experiment some some broad match to see what the traffic looks like, yes, but I never start a campaign with all broad match. It's a way to gather data quickly, yes, and if you're not inclined to use the Keyword tools to help you find good keywords, then that's absolutely one tactic you could use. (I'm hesitant, yes. Most of the traffic your campaign gets while using Broad match is not going to result in clicks. This means Broad match won't help you beef up one of the most important campaign pieces--your negative keyword list.) If you decide to try it, I would suggest you gather your data quickly and move to start shutting down the Broad match keywords as soon as you can--before all of those inappropriate searches damage your account's quality metrics.

 

Yes, I agree that Phrase match would likely be a better option. As long as you start with high probability phrases, you're giong to find most of your additional keywords that way.

 

As far as match types and how to organize them--again, there are as many opinions on that as there are people with AdWords campaigns. For me--again, it just depends on the client's industry.

 


Theresa
Google AdWords Top Contributor
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

Re: Keyword Research for New Accounts

Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
# 4
Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
Use all,but not broad, just broad match modified. You will have a core keyword ( the term that will be in every other variation) which will help you expand into other keywords.

So "used cars" is a core keyword which will pick up others. Have this in own adgroup. Once you have pulled out other good terms I would put them as negatives against the core keywords. So "used cars for sale" I would put "for sale" as a negative at ad group level. Then you know the new term not likely to be picked up by the core term.

Only way to do it really is try, test and review.

Re: Keyword Research for New Accounts

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Theresa,

Thank you for the quick and insightful response. 

This will help greatly!

 

Thanks!

Re: Keyword Research for New Accounts

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 6
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

RBall

 

I have used modified +used +cars broad match but it seemed like it was slowing down my traffic a lot. For example, I believe I had less clicks with modified broad match than for a phrase for certain keywords. Anyway, thanks for the reposnse  - and I am actually implementing ++ again...

 

Thanks,

Re: Keyword Research for New Accounts

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 7
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Adword-Tricks,

This is an interesting way of doing it. I have always done this but putting a core keyword in its own separate ad groups makes it a lot more cleaner.

 

Thanks!