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Keyword Question

Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
# 1
Follower ✭ ☆ ☆

I am building my first campaign for a music school in Orange County, California. I am targeting only people in Orange County, but also assuming people will use Orange County in their search query. So if I use the keyword "music lessons orange county", would I also use "music lessons" in addition? Or does the fact that those two words are already the longer keyword make it unnecessary to use them alone?

 

I could do this will a million keywords, such as:

 

private music lessons

private music lessons orange county

music teachers 

music teachers orange county

etc.

 

Am I wasting my time doing it both ways?

 

Also, because the school covers every city in Orange County, I am thinking I should enter every search term with every city in Orange County. For myself, I know if I lived in Newport Beach and wanted to find music lessons, I'd probably search for "music lessons newport beach". On the other hand, since I am only targeting people who live in Orange County, does this make this keyword unnecessary? This would be a huge list to not only include every city, but to include every city with the various keywords attached. But does it make sense to do it?

 

Thanks so much.

1 Expert replyverified_user

Re: Keyword Question

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor
Hi Dexter B,

I would recommend using geo-tageting and include search intent (which is the default). It's not necessary to include the geographic modifiers in your keywords, Google is pretty good at figuring it out.

On the other hand, if your ad says "Orange County Music School", some one from Newport Beach may be more inclined to click on an ad with "Newport Beach Music School". If you want to specifically target that area with different ad copy, you can create a separate campaign, or try to create a separate ad group within the current campaign. As a separate campaign, just geo-target that area. As a separate ad group, I'd use BMM with the geographic modifiers for the targeted areas.

Best of Luck!

Pete
petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

Re: Keyword Question

Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
# 3
Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
Thanks so much, Pete. I think I did do the "geo-targeting". Still getting used to the phrases, but whatever the setting is that makes only people in Orange County see my ads.

Do you have an answer to the question about repeating keywords that are already in a longer keyword?

Such as "music school". If I have "newport beach music school", does the fact that it is already in the longer keyword make it unnecessary to use as a stand alone keyword?

Re: Keyword Question

Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
Hi Dexter

Just want add a bit here, it also depends on the keyword match type that you are targeting. You should consider reading about match types before starting your campaign:
1. https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2497836?hl=en
2. https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/6324?hl=en

Abhishek

Re: Keyword Question

Badged Google Partner
# 5
Badged Google Partner
Dexter,

"Such as "music school". If I have "newport beach music school", does the fact that it is already in the longer keyword make it unnecessary to use as a stand alone keyword?"

The answer here is it depends upon the match types you use.

If you are using a Broad Match for both terms then Music School ( as broad match) or +Music +School more then likely with have the Better Ad Rank and initial quality score to win the auction over the lesser term in broad match newport beach music school.

It also depends on how you set the match types and the bids upon those terms.

One way to think about your account structure in which Peter gave you some advice, is also to think about the match type scenarios.

For example
Campaign 1
+Music + School with a bid of say $5 just for example
(as broad match - will pick up a lot of keyword queries)

[newport beach music school] - with a Bid of say $6
- exact match so only that keyword will trigger the ad

When someone types in exactly newport beach music school your exact match should win the auction and your ad's if you created the ad group correctly would display the ad that would include the words newport beach music school.

If someone typed in
" where do I find a good music school"
"How much does a good music school cost"
"Music should only be taught in elementary school"
"I hate hearing loud music in school"

Every one of those keyword queries would be eligible for your ads in the auction under both broad match and broad match modifier ( + + ) variations of your keyword choices.

The thing to be ware is the Negative Keywords you should also apply when using any broad or modified terms as you notice from the last example that "Loud music in school" would trigger your ad, so the use of Loud as a negative match would stop that your ad from showing here and say you an impression and possible a click on a irrelevant query.

As my Colleagues here have pointed out, learn the match types, map out your targeting and create ad groups and targeting and keyword terms that sync you keywords with your ads.

Read up on Negative Keywords as well
https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/105671?hl=en
https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2453972?hl=en

Re: Keyword Question

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor
Hi Dexter B,

As the other posters here mentioned, it depends on the match type. Newport Beach Music School is 26 characters, so you wouldn't be able to use that in a headline, but you could include Newport Beach in the ad copy, making it more specific to the query. You might consider using BMM on the longer phrase and placing it in a separate ad group.

I strongly recommend against broad match. Use BMM, phrase and exact match.

Pete
petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

Re: Keyword Question

Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
# 7
Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
Thanks Eric. This is a big help. It hurts my brain and all, of course! Smiley Wink I have to educate myself on match types, as I have with everything so far. I keep only having short amounts of time to work on this, and I always think I'm going to get my first campaign up and going, but I end up down a new rabbit trail learning something new, albeit valuable.

Thanks again.

Re: Keyword Question

Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
# 8
Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
Thanks Pete. I appreciate your input.

Re: Keyword Question

Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
# 9
Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
Thanks Abhishek. I'll check out those links.