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Keyword Conflicts?

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# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I am going to use a very basic example. A church in Tampa is using AdWords, they create four ad groups:

 

Tampa Church

City B Church

City C Church

Church

 

Inside each of those adgroups they use the keyword __city name___ church, then in the final ad group they just list the word Church.

 

Why is it that when you look at the word Church it says:

 

  • This keyword is triggering other ads with a similar keyword: tampa church


What if someone from one of those other cities simply typed in the word Church, it would be showing them the ad for Tampa not their city?

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Accepted by topic author Noah C
September 2015

Re: Keyword Conflicts?

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hello, Noah and welcome to our community.

 

This happens because the match type of the keywords is "broad" (see this document for details on match type: https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2497836?hl=en) and that a search for church (just the word church, alone), can match the keyword tampa church.

 

Search terms are matched to keywords according to ad rank (see this document: https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2756257?hl=en) when more than one keyword matched the search term.

 

In your case, I would suggest using keywords such as "tampa church" (phrase match),  [tampa church] or +tampa +church (modified broad match) if you want your ads to show only when the word tampa or a close variation or misspelling is also present in the query.

 

Apart from that, negative keywords should be used to block any possibility to show the ad from the wrong ad group, especially when broad keywords are used (ex.: -"tampa" should be a negative keyword in all ad groups except tampa, "city b" in all except itself and so on.)

 

Good luck!

Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’ Learn how here.

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Noah C
September 2015

Re: Keyword Conflicts?

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hello, Noah and welcome to our community.

 

This happens because the match type of the keywords is "broad" (see this document for details on match type: https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2497836?hl=en) and that a search for church (just the word church, alone), can match the keyword tampa church.

 

Search terms are matched to keywords according to ad rank (see this document: https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2756257?hl=en) when more than one keyword matched the search term.

 

In your case, I would suggest using keywords such as "tampa church" (phrase match),  [tampa church] or +tampa +church (modified broad match) if you want your ads to show only when the word tampa or a close variation or misspelling is also present in the query.

 

Apart from that, negative keywords should be used to block any possibility to show the ad from the wrong ad group, especially when broad keywords are used (ex.: -"tampa" should be a negative keyword in all ad groups except tampa, "city b" in all except itself and so on.)

 

Good luck!

Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’ Learn how here.

Re: Keyword Conflicts?

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor
Hi Noah,

I just want to give you a different perspective on how you might organize your account.

Take a look at Geo-targeting. Setup up a different campaign for each city and target each campaign to the geographic area. Set the campaign targeting to include "search intent".

With a single keyword--church-- in each of the ad groups. If a user enters a search query of "church in Tampa" or "Tampa church", the ad for Tampa church will show. If the user is physically located within Tampa, a search query of "church" will also trigger the Tampa church ad.

I am at a loss on the "church" ad group. Without any Geo-targeting that could potentially show to an awful lot of people all around the world. I'm not sure that's what you want.

Best of Luck!

Pete
petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords