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Infinity Logic : limited budgets =exception=>unlimited bugdets = rule

[ Edited ]
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# 1
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[Later edit] according to adwords "A campaign is limited by budget " represents an exception  [/Later edit]

 

I have setup a campaign with around 100 search terms in exact match, they include keywords that are in BMM or phrase match in the main campaign , of course I did bid higher on the exact matches as I have learned so far to be a good practice.

 

After a few weeks of low traffic I tried to dig for some explanation why the so popular BMM are still triggered and the exact matches of them are not. Of course the campaign with 100 search terms had a lower budget than the campaign with the 700 other keywords.

 

 I think the answer for the low traffic of the "Exact match from search terms Campaign" lies in this paragraph :

 

https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2756257?hl=en

 

"Exceptions to preferences

The AdWords system has some exceptions that might apply to all of the preferences listed above....

 

A campaign is limited by budget 

 

Your campaign's daily budget can affect each of the scenarios listed above. If a keyword is in a budget-restricted campaign, which means that the campaign's budget isn't high enough to accrue all possible traffic, the keyword won't always be able to trigger an ad even if it otherwise could.

 

Example

Here's an example of how a budget-restricted campaign could affect the use of keywords when multiple keywords are the same but have different match types.

Let's say your campaigns are called "Clogged Sinks" and "Broken Water Heater." In your "Clogged Sinks" campaign, you have the exact match keyword plumber, and in your "Broken Water Heater" campaign, you have the broad match keyword plumber.

All else being equal, the exact match keyword in your "Clogged Sinks" campaign would trigger an ad when someone searched for the term plumber because it's the more restrictive match type. However, if your "Clogged Sinks" campaign were budget-restricted, then the exact match keyword in this campaign would sometimes be unable to trigger an ad. This means the broad match keyword in your "Broken Water Heater" campaign would trigger an ad instead.

 

1) Should we still keep learning about optimisations since it is clear that anyway you group your matching types, Googles selects to spend from where you have the most daily money left ? Is this fair ?

 

2) When is a campaign's budget high enough to accrue all possible traffic, as they put it ?

Is there a metric for this ? Do we live in a world of unlimited budgets ?

Can we put the infinity sign  in the text box for the daily campaign budget ?

 

3) Is there a definition in their documentation about what is and what is not a "budget-restricted campaign" ?

 

4) According to what principles ( except greed ) are unlimited budgets a rule and limited budgets exceptions ?

 

5) Is there a 100% working method to get my "exact match keywords" to actually match "exact search terms" ? Where is the exit path in this labyrinth of rules ?

 

This is not a hate message, it is a tormented effort to understand the proper use of a system that has many non-intuitive rules and over 100 definitions and features, that combine to give different results.

 

2 Expert replyverified_user

Re: Infinity Logic : unlimited bugdets = rule, limited budgets =except

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# 2
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Hi Adrian,

 

I am more used to seeing answers from you than queries. It's a bit of surprise... Smiley Happy

 

1. There are also other aspects of QS and optimization which are not related to your current questions. So we should still keep learning about optimization techniques.

 

2. A campaign's budget is not high enough to accrue all possible traffic when you miss traffic due to a low daily budget. Generally speaking, *accrued traffic/all traffic* could be a good metric. The various Impression Share (IS) metrics you can view in the account interface are along this line.

 

3. I don't think there is a definition of "budget-restricted campaigns", however, it refers to scenarios where a particular campaign's *Lost IS (budget)>0*. I'd note that this status of the campaign may vary day by day.

 

4. There is no Policy stating that unlimited budgets should be regarded as a rule and limited budgets as exceptions.

 

5. If your campaign containing the exact match keywords has a budget able to support them 24/7, they will - everything else equal - outperform BMM and phrase match. 

 

Your queries are highly appreciated ... Smiley Happy

 

Best,

Lakatos

 

Re: Infinity Logic : unlimited bugdets = rule, limited budgets =except

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# 3
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Thank you for sharing your expertise on this one. I try to answer simple queries as an exercise to push me to read more, when I feel saturated with reading. Funny thing, every time I read the same pages, new lines catch my attention.

 

To put it in short, should I raise the daily budget of the "exact matching keywords" to +1 $ vs. the main campaign, just to make sure that the system does not consider this campaign to be low budgeted ?

 

About my title , when they say in that link

 

"Exceptions to preferences

The AdWords system has some exceptions that might apply to all of the preferences listed above. The exceptions to the preference rules shown above might occur for the following examples:

 
A campaign is limited by budget
 
It translates to me that this first listed exception "a campaign is limited by budget" overrides all the other adwords keyword selection rules to match search terms.
So "limited by budget" is the exception, therefore unlimited budget being the oposite must be the rule.

Re: Infinity Logic : unlimited bugdets = rule, limited budgets =except

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# 4
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Hi Adrian,

 

"So "limited by budget" is the exception, therefore unlimited budget being the opposite must be the rule."

 

Ah... that's where it comes from. In this sense, you are, of course, right. However, don't attach much importance it, Google does not expect you to fully budget each  of your campaigns.

 

"should I raise the daily budget of the "exact matching keywords" to +1 $ vs. the main campaign.. ?"

 

Chances are I could not determine the budget that way. I'd say raise the budget till *Lost IS (budget)=0*.

 

BestSmiley Happy

Lakatos

Re: Infinity Logic : unlimited bugdets = rule, limited budgets =except

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# 5
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I am reading this metric 

 

Search Lost IS (budget): The percentage of time that your ads weren't shown on the Search Network due to insufficient budget. This data is available at the campaign level only

 

1) I think this metric compares my campaign with all the other competition, not only with my other campaigns, so I cannot compare "little Campaign 1 has Search Lost IS = 50%" and "big Campaign 2 has Search Lost IS = 40%" , therefore the keywords from campaign 2 override all the keywords from campaign 1 in being prefferred by google using the rule discussed above.

 

2) The metric jumps from 10 % to 10% , it is too fuzzy.

 

3) It is recalculated on a daily basis to make a parallel in the same manner as the "Daily campaign budget" ?

 

Amazing enough it shows me zero even if a lot of "exact match" clicks are attributed to the "big campaign". Do you have anything except zero for this metric in the Dimensions tab ?

 

exact-match-campaign-search-lost-is.png 

 

 

 

There must be another way around this Foxy rule of "limited mistery"

Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by topic author Adrian B
September 2015

Re: Infinity Logic : unlimited bugdets = rule, limited budgets =except

[ Edited ]
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# 6
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Adrian,

 

1. "this metric compares my campaign with all the other competition, not only with my other campaigns"

 

This metric compares the traffic you captured to the traffic you lost due to a low budget. 

 

2. I looked up one of my own search campaigns. Lost IS (budget) is 77.35% which indicates the values can be granular enough provided you have a decent traffic. Chances are errors are higher when traffic is low. (As it often happens with stats.)

 

3. In the above case, the values vary day by day as follows.

 

July 1          79.75%

July 2          79.21%

July 3          78.26%

 

Budget was not changed. The values varied day by day. 

 

In *Enhanced Campaigns*, Google does not display Lost IS (budget) any more, it can only be calculated. Maybe that's why you see the zeros. (You can display competitive metrics by customizing the columns.)

 

--- Regarding your table I'd like to see the Search IS column too. 

 

********************************************

 

I am afraid we are being lost in details. Competitive metrics never worked 100% perfectly and I doubt they ever will. Actually I thought we were discussing theory, not their imperfect implementation. It is always difficult to discuss e.g. errors caused by random bugs. 

 

Back to the principal issue. If you keep Lost IS (budget) at zero your exact match keywords will work as in the text book. Because you only need to knock out your other campaign, a smaller daily budget may also be sufficient. We can't discuss it in detail because we know nothing about the specifics of that other campaign.

 

Best,

Lakatos

Re: Infinity Logic : unlimited bugdets = rule, limited budgets =except

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# 7
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That makes sense , thank you.
Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by topic author Adrian B
September 2015

Re: Infinity Logic : unlimited bugdets = rule, limited budgets =except

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# 8
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Hi Adrian,

If you want the BMM never to show for exact match, ad the keyword as negative exact. Your other campaign should then get the impressions.

Question: What is the QS for exact and BMM. Is it possible the BMM has a higher QS? That could cause the BMM to be selected over the exact match, even when the exact match has a higher bid.

Let's say BMM has QS 9 with a bid of $.50 and exact has QS 8 with bid of $.55.
BMM would have AdRank of 4.5, exact AdRank 4.4. In this case, BMM has a higher AdRank with the lower bid. If both match types were in the same ad group, I would not expect to see that, but being in separate campaigns it is entirely possible.

Best of Luck!

Pete
petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

Re: Infinity Logic : limited budgets =exception=>unlimited bugdets

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# 9
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I just took the advice from another person : " Dude , why don't you move those exact keywords back in their own campaign. That rule is just another way of telling you to be better organized ." Amazing enough deleted keywords have no history to look at, they just dissapear. And I found a help page about the limited budget warning that should appear in an account with enough adrank but not enough daily budget , it should tell you exactly how much to raise the budget to gain most of the clicks.

Re: Infinity Logic : limited budgets =exception=>unlimited bugdets

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# 10
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 >> Question: What is the QS for exact and BMM. Is it possible the BMM has a higher QS? <<

 

Guys, this particular question is nonsense. By rule, all matching types of the same KW do have the same QS. When you see deviations in the interface that's just because in some cases AdWords may need time to align them.  

 

For the purposes of calculating the QS of KWs, Google only collects and considers stats accrued by the exact match. Than this exact match QS is shared by all the other matching options.

 

Best,

Lakatos