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How to properly format negative keywords

Follower ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Follower ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi

 

I'm a bit confused with negative keywords, I thought I had a handle on things, but it's been a long time since I did a Adwords workshop and maybe thins have chnaged since then so I'mn a bit confused.

 

I read the official help page here http://support.google.com/adwords/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=2453972

 

but it hasn't really addressed my concerns properly.

 

I opened up a clients accout and saw a myriad of multiple word phrases on his negative keyword list.

 

Along the lines of.

 

cheap dental practice

groupon dentist

low cost dentistry

 

etc..

 

My understanding was that you only needed to put one word and it will ban all keywords that contain any of these words in the search phrase... So for our use.

 

cheap

groupon

"low cost"

 

Would suffice..

 

I thought that was the right way to do it but the conviction of the client that his way is correct has made me a littl;e bit unsure. What's the correct way.

 

If my way is correct can you also explain whether the phrase match works in negative keywords. I

 

What I'm trying todo is ban all keywords that that have "low cost" is the search terms. But if it's just low on it's own or cost on it's own then the phrase would be fine.

2 Expert replyverified_user
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Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by rosiel (Follower ✭ ✭ ☆)
September 2015

Re: How to properly format negative keywords

Participant ✭ ☆ ☆
# 2
Participant ✭ ☆ ☆

Hi morecaffeine,
 

Kindly review following points to understnd about negative keywords:
 

Campaign And Ad Group Negatives:

You can apply negatives at the campaign level and the ad group level in Google AdWords.Campaign negatives would apply to every ad group in your campaign, so you should make sure these negatives can be applied to a broad set of categories and keywords. For example, "free", "used", "cheap", etc. are negatives often used at the campaign level.

On the other hand, ad group-level negatives only apply to the ad group at hand. There your other ad groups will not be affected. Using our example from earlier for bicycles, "mountain" could be a negative keyword if you don’t sell mountain bikes. But how about if you sell "mountain gear" on your website? If you applied "mountain" as a campaign negative, then your ads wouldn’t show for people searching for "mountain gear". That wouldn’t be good, and that’s only one example of how the wrong choice of negative keywords could get you in trouble.

 

Singular, Plural, And Misspellings:


When using negatives, you should also use variations of your negative keywords to ensure you weed out untargeted queries. This includes adding singular and plural variations of your negative keywords and misspellings. Using misspellings and plural versions of keywords can ensure you have a thorough negatives list per campaign and ad group.

For example:
following negatives based on our mountain bike example from earlier:
mountain
mountains
mmountain
mountaine
montain
montains

 

Phrase And Exact Match Negatives:


When including negatives, you might quickly determine several broad match keywords you would want to add (such as "mountain" from earlier). But, you should be pleased to know that both phrase match and exact match negatives can be included in AdWords.

Phrase match keywords can be included in quotes and will stop your ads from triggering when the phrase is included in a search query (in the exact order). For example, "oakland raiders", "for children", or "laptop computer". This enables you to increase your level of targeting for negatives by addressing very specific phrases. You can add phrase match negatives by surrounding the words with quotes. For example, if you sell costumes, but don’t offer Power Rangers costumes, then you could use "Power Rangers" as negative phrase match.
 

Exact match works a little differently. When you use exact match negative keywords, AdWords will not show your ads when someone exactly searches for the keyword at hand (only the exact words you include as a negative). Exact match negatives can be included by using brackets around your keyword, like [power rangers]. Using our example from above, if you added [Power Rangers] as an exact match negative, then your ads would not show when someone searched for "Power Rangers" by itself, but your ad could show for "Power Ranges Costumes" or "Buy Power Rangers". It’s only the exact keyword you include as an exact match negative that would stop your ads from showing. You won’t use exact match negatives as often as phrase and broad, but it can be extremely useful in certain situations.

I follow below link to explain you so for more deatils kindly visit this link:

 

http://www.searchenginepeople.com/blog/negative-keywords-christmas-ppc.html

 

Thanks
Anchal

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by rosiel (Follower ✭ ✭ ☆)
September 2015

Re: How to properly format negative keywords

Participant ✭ ☆ ☆
# 2
Participant ✭ ☆ ☆

Hi morecaffeine,
 

Kindly review following points to understnd about negative keywords:
 

Campaign And Ad Group Negatives:

You can apply negatives at the campaign level and the ad group level in Google AdWords.Campaign negatives would apply to every ad group in your campaign, so you should make sure these negatives can be applied to a broad set of categories and keywords. For example, "free", "used", "cheap", etc. are negatives often used at the campaign level.

On the other hand, ad group-level negatives only apply to the ad group at hand. There your other ad groups will not be affected. Using our example from earlier for bicycles, "mountain" could be a negative keyword if you don’t sell mountain bikes. But how about if you sell "mountain gear" on your website? If you applied "mountain" as a campaign negative, then your ads wouldn’t show for people searching for "mountain gear". That wouldn’t be good, and that’s only one example of how the wrong choice of negative keywords could get you in trouble.

 

Singular, Plural, And Misspellings:


When using negatives, you should also use variations of your negative keywords to ensure you weed out untargeted queries. This includes adding singular and plural variations of your negative keywords and misspellings. Using misspellings and plural versions of keywords can ensure you have a thorough negatives list per campaign and ad group.

For example:
following negatives based on our mountain bike example from earlier:
mountain
mountains
mmountain
mountaine
montain
montains

 

Phrase And Exact Match Negatives:


When including negatives, you might quickly determine several broad match keywords you would want to add (such as "mountain" from earlier). But, you should be pleased to know that both phrase match and exact match negatives can be included in AdWords.

Phrase match keywords can be included in quotes and will stop your ads from triggering when the phrase is included in a search query (in the exact order). For example, "oakland raiders", "for children", or "laptop computer". This enables you to increase your level of targeting for negatives by addressing very specific phrases. You can add phrase match negatives by surrounding the words with quotes. For example, if you sell costumes, but don’t offer Power Rangers costumes, then you could use "Power Rangers" as negative phrase match.
 

Exact match works a little differently. When you use exact match negative keywords, AdWords will not show your ads when someone exactly searches for the keyword at hand (only the exact words you include as a negative). Exact match negatives can be included by using brackets around your keyword, like [power rangers]. Using our example from above, if you added [Power Rangers] as an exact match negative, then your ads would not show when someone searched for "Power Rangers" by itself, but your ad could show for "Power Ranges Costumes" or "Buy Power Rangers". It’s only the exact keyword you include as an exact match negative that would stop your ads from showing. You won’t use exact match negatives as often as phrase and broad, but it can be extremely useful in certain situations.

I follow below link to explain you so for more deatils kindly visit this link:

 

http://www.searchenginepeople.com/blog/negative-keywords-christmas-ppc.html

 

Thanks
Anchal

Re: How to properly format negative keywords

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hi morecaffeine


You are right with your conclusions;

Neha, a frequent poster on our community, wrote a nice and comprehensive article, that explains all about negative keywords,

Worth reading, over a good cup of coffee. Smiley Happy

 

Negative Keywords: As Important as Positive Keywords

 

-Moshe

 

 

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’

Re: How to properly format negative keywords

[ Edited ]
Follower ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Follower ✭ ✭ ✭

Thanks for the response guys.

 

So how would adwords treat a phrase in the negative keyword that does not have a "" or [] around them?

 

e.g. From the example earlier, how would adwords treat the the following negative keywords in the campaign, note: it does not have a phrase or exact match indictator.

 

cheap dental practice

groupon dentist

low cost dentistry

Re: How to properly format negative keywords

Top Contributor
# 5
Top Contributor

Hi more caffeine,

 

Just as with "positive" broad match, negative broad match is very broad and could be triggered by any of the words within your negative keyword.

 

Negative Broad match: cheap dental practice

 

Could block impressions for cheap, dental or practice. I don't think that's what you had in mind. I'd probably use cheap, groupon, and "low cost" as negatives in this case. You could use "cheap dental" as negative phrase.

 

I think you're on the right track in modifying your negative keywords.

 

Best of Luck!

 

Pete

 

petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords