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Google AdWords: Why is my keyword relevance poor? (Part 2)

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Google Employee
# 1
Google Employee

In October, I touched upon the basics of keyword relevance that included the definition of relevance, some tips to keep your keywords relevant, how new keywords have a low relevance score and suggestions to improve the score.

This month, I will talk about some other scenarios which can affect your keyword relevance score without being so obvious to you:

1. Are all the keywords in your ad group 'relevant' to each other?

So, if you have 'red shoes, blue socks, white leggings and black jacket' all in the same ad group, then it is highly likely that you will see a poor relevance score. Relevance at the ad group level means 'how relevant your keywords are to each other as well.' Hence, structure your ad groups based on similar themes and use very tightly themed keywords. This means that your keywords related to 'red shoes' should have a different ad group that the keywords 'blue socks.' To add to that, you should also highlight ‘red shoes’ in your ad headline and link the ad to a page on your site that has the exact product!

One of the best ways to achieve this is to map your website. So create ad groups based on the sections you have on your website (you may still break them down further if you have different products on the same web page).

2. Are your keywords too generic or too specific?

If you use a keyword such as ‘shoes’ in broad match, it will start getting loads of impressions for any search term even remotely related to shoes such as from a student reading about ‘origin of shoes’ which may not be very relevant to you if you are ‘selling’ shoes.

On the other hand, if you are using too specific keywords such as ‘size 10 Rihanna style gumboots pink straps’, then it may get a low relevance, even though it is specific, because it is too specific and people may not be searching on this query. If this is a case, you could use a more broader term such as ‘pink gumboots’.

On a related note, you should know about keywords with ‘Low search volume’ A status that's given to a keyword with very little to no search history on Google and avoid using them as they do not add any value to your ad group.

3. Are "all" your keywords in the ad group performing well?

One thing you must know is that if you have a few poor CTR keywords in your ad group, then they can bring down the relevance and quality score of other keywords from the same ad group too. So it’s important to pay attention to all your keywords.

When you notice poor performing keywords when your ad group/keywords are fairly new, you can try bidding higher on them so that they may pull up their CTR and score. Keep monitoring them periodically, but in the end, you may have to pause/delete keywords that are not working well for you over a few months.

On the other hand, if some poor performing keywords are veryimportant to you, you may want to move them to a new ad group so that they don’t directly impact the scores of your other high performing keywords. Nevertheless, keep monitoring these keywords regularly and try to keep the bids high. But again, you may have to pause/delete keywords that are not working well for you over a few weeks/months.

 

 

 

I will come back with a few more scenarios that I can think of Smiley Happy

 

 

4 Expert replyverified_user
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Accepted by Mini-CM (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: Google AdWords: Why is my keyword relevance poor? (Part 2)

Google Employee
# 4
Google Employee

Hi David,

 

Good question!

 

As such, there are a lot of factors that impact the quality score and we usually cannot pinpoint or guarantee what will impact the score more for a given keyword or ad position. As you mentioned, a lot depends on your competitors bids/positions as well. Moreover, ad position itself is dynamic so it is difficult to pre-empt it and manage CTR accordingly. However, a high CTR, more often than not, does help in boosting the QS (to recap the QS factors).

 

Hence, for new advertisers, we usually recommend that they keep as high a bid as they are comfortable with so that they have a good chance at impressions, clicks and resulting CTR which will in the long run help them get a better quality score.

 

I hope this makes sense!

 

Regards,

 

Shilpi

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September 2015

Re: Google AdWords: Why is my keyword relevance poor? (Part 2)

Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 9
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Re: Google AdWords: Why is my keyword relevance poor? (Part 2)

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi Shilpi, great post - every advertiser should read and digest this.  If I had a penny for every "why are my keywords not relevant" type question...

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

Re: Google AdWords: Why is my keyword relevance poor? (Part 2)

Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
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Hi

 

you can try bidding higher on them so that they may pull up their CTR and score

 

But isn´t quality score relative to position and other advertisers (in that position)? A high CTR doesn´t, on its own, give a high WQ, but only if you - judged by CTR - perform better than other advertisers in that position right?

Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by Mini-CM (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: Google AdWords: Why is my keyword relevance poor? (Part 2)

Google Employee
# 4
Google Employee

Hi David,

 

Good question!

 

As such, there are a lot of factors that impact the quality score and we usually cannot pinpoint or guarantee what will impact the score more for a given keyword or ad position. As you mentioned, a lot depends on your competitors bids/positions as well. Moreover, ad position itself is dynamic so it is difficult to pre-empt it and manage CTR accordingly. However, a high CTR, more often than not, does help in boosting the QS (to recap the QS factors).

 

Hence, for new advertisers, we usually recommend that they keep as high a bid as they are comfortable with so that they have a good chance at impressions, clicks and resulting CTR which will in the long run help them get a better quality score.

 

I hope this makes sense!

 

Regards,

 

Shilpi

Re: Google AdWords: Why is my keyword relevance poor? (Part 2)

Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
Truly you need impressions and clicks to get a ctr, and if you´re position is so low and competition so fierce that youren´t getting any clicks in your (presubably) low position you need to raise your bid to get a higher position.

Still, I believe my point is really important, that the higher ctr that usually follows with a higher position not by itself increases quality score in the same way it does when ctr increases but all things equal.

Re: Google AdWords: Why is my keyword relevance poor? (Part 2)

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor

Hi,

 

Very good and Informative Article!

 

I think even after having strict adgroups/keywords/adcopies/landing page relation we notice low quality score, when we start a new campaign. And one of the factor is 'Past performance of other advertisers" for those keywords, which we can't control. But I beleive if we maintain relevancy between adgroups & search queries associated with those adgroups, it can really help boosting ctr. Higher the exact match share better the relevacny and thus QS.

 

CTR is important and one of the main factor to acheive good QS. But we can only achieve good CTR, if the relevancy is high. 

 

About Low Search Volume Keywords - I prefer to run them for few months, if they are not getting any impressions or clicks and haivng decent QS, they does not harm campaign performance and contribute to campaign QS.

 

If the Low search volumne keywords having very less QS, I Prefer to pause/delete them as they harm overall campagin QS average count.


I noticed four times of Low search volume keywords so far:

 

  • No Impressions No Clicks - Decent QS - Prefer to leave them in campaign as it is.
  • No Impressions No Clicks - Poor QS - Pause/Delete them.
  • Very few Impressions Very Few clicks - Good CTR - Keep them as it is in the campaign.
  • Large Impressions No Clicks - Pause/Delete them.

Just a thought!

 

Thanks

Neha

 

 

 

 

 

 

Neha Gupta, AdWordsTop Contributor Follow Me: My Blog | Twitter | Google+ | LinkedIn
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Re: Google AdWords: Why is my keyword relevance poor? (Part 2)

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 7
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Shilpi, you missed the : in the url for the QS factors

Could you also comment on what is the standard wait period of a new account to start benefiting from the high bidding rates? That way we can set expectations for new clients accordingly!

Re: Google AdWords: Why is my keyword relevance poor? (Part 2)

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 8
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
This is super helpful, thank you. Is there any way to show quality score as a column beside each keyword so you can quickly and easily delete low performing ones?
Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: Google AdWords: Why is my keyword relevance poor? (Part 2)

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# 9
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Re: Google AdWords: Why is my keyword relevance poor? (Part 2)

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 10
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Thanks David! Super helpful, now I just need to figure out why my ads aren't racking up any impressions despite being approved and some of the keywords stating "yes" under "Showing ads right now?"