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Excluding a search term when it is a sub-phrase of a desired search term.

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# 1
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This should be fairly simple, but I just can't get my head around it.  I want one of my ad campaigns to show when someone enters something like "55 gallon drum heaters" or "55 gallon drum heaters for sale" and many other variations of those phrases.  I don't want my ads to show if someone enters "55 gallon drum for sale" or just "55 gallon drum".

 

Do I need to do exact phrase matching for every variation I can think of for [55 gallon drum heaters] or [55 gallon drum heaters for sale]?  Or, am I better off trying to think up all the potential negatives and make those exact: i.e., [55 gallon drum for sale], [55 gallon drum], [55 gallon drum kerosene burning heaters], et al?

 

Thanks,

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Accepted by topic author RickGarber
April 2017

Excluding a search term when it is a sub-phrase of a desired search term.

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# 2
Badged Google Partner

A little bit of both. Smiley Happy 

 

+drum +heaters might cover the most valuable queries for your target market, but you may also want to exclude -"55 gallon drum for sale". Users may not actually be searching specifically for '55 gallon drum heaters', or maybe they are... You are going to have to do some research and keep an eye on the search terms report to know for sure. You're best off starting with a small budget you can afford to experiment with and start getting some data before you try to scale up.

 

The ad copy is perhaps even more important than the targeted KW's. Make sure you are clear that you sell heaters, not drums, and you can use the ad content to help sort out irrelevant clicks.

 

What's the target market? Do you primarily serve one industry in particular? There's more to AdWords than just KW targeted search advertising. There may be other ways to accomplish your objective.

Tom

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Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author RickGarber
April 2017

Excluding a search term when it is a sub-phrase of a desired search term.

Badged Google Partner
# 2
Badged Google Partner

A little bit of both. Smiley Happy 

 

+drum +heaters might cover the most valuable queries for your target market, but you may also want to exclude -"55 gallon drum for sale". Users may not actually be searching specifically for '55 gallon drum heaters', or maybe they are... You are going to have to do some research and keep an eye on the search terms report to know for sure. You're best off starting with a small budget you can afford to experiment with and start getting some data before you try to scale up.

 

The ad copy is perhaps even more important than the targeted KW's. Make sure you are clear that you sell heaters, not drums, and you can use the ad content to help sort out irrelevant clicks.

 

What's the target market? Do you primarily serve one industry in particular? There's more to AdWords than just KW targeted search advertising. There may be other ways to accomplish your objective.

Tom

Excluding a search term when it is a sub-phrase of a desired search term.

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
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Hi Tom,

 

Thanks for the reply.  We've been running the ads for that particular product line off and on for several years; depends on the season and stock levels.  Our target market for this specific product and the other products we sell are general industrial users (maintenance personnel, painters, aggregate workers, et al) across a number of industries.  The search terms report has been useful in helping to make this and other campaigns more efficient, but it still galls me when I see that we pay for clicks for a search for "55 gallon drum barbecue kit" when the ad clearly states that we are selling heaters for 55 gallon drums, and then the person who clicked on the ad bounces right out of our site.  In actuality, this campaign is fairly well cleaned up, but we still have others where there are similar problems.  We sell industrial heaters, some are general purpose, some are for specific applications or pieces of equipment, but the ads all clearly say "heater(s)".

 

Maybe there's just no easy way to get rid of that type of ad clicker.  I guess it's sort of like making products that are idiot-proof; they just keep making smarter idiots.  So, when they're out looking for "heaters for lizard cages" they'll always click on ads for Heaters For Industrial Chemical Tanks.  (I know, I know, I know...I thought I had made "lizard" an account-wide negative, but it turns out I'd only done it for a campaign that had previously been drawing a lot of those type of clicks.)

 

Thanks Again,

Rick