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Editing ad's - makes a new ad....

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# 1
Follower ✭ ✭ ☆

Come on people..  If an ad is edited DON'T make a new ad out of it and screw with my stats???? 

 

I had an ad, that was created by a former admin.  Went in to correct a simple spelling mistake, and POOF, new ad.  New Stats and avg position was in the toilet....  Quality score the same, key words the same, just a change of 1 character....

 

A "new" ad is a NEW ad. An edited ad is the same ad..... 

4 Expert replyverified_user

Re: Editing ad's - makes a new ad....

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi Key_West_Expres,

 

Actually, and edited ad is considered to be a new ad, it needs to get approval the same way a newly created ad does.

 

From this Help Article

 

"Just be aware that editing an ad is the same as creating a new ad and deleting the old one, which means that your new ad will have to go through our usual approval process. Also, keep in mind that we'll reset your new ad's performance statistics to zero."

 

Google takes many precautions to see that all ads within the Adwords platform adhere to strict guidelines and by making a change to an ad, as small as it may be, will trigger a new review process, each and every time an ad is edited.

 

-Tom

Tommy Sands, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
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Re: Editing ad's - makes a new ad....

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# 3
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Ok, I get that, but that doesn't make it a "new" ad. It's an edited ad..   I have no problem with G reviewing my ad, but don't mess with what's already there, data wise...

 

IE, MS/Bing allows editing, they still review, but an edited ad, is an edited ad and all data remains....

Re: Editing ad's - makes a new ad....

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

Hello,

 

I may not right here. But you will see edited ad as a deleted ad in your adgroup with previous stats.

 

Thanks,

Neha Gupta

Neha Gupta, AdWordsTop Contributor Follow Me: My Blog | Twitter | Google+ | LinkedIn
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Re: Editing ad's - makes a new ad....

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# 5
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Yes, you do.  But, what I'm getting at, is the edited ad is not a "new" ad, just one that has had editing changes.  If I'd wanted to create a new ad, I would have.

 

I know that G resets all stats, I'm just making a statement, that I don't agree with policy, in general.  That's all....

Re: Editing ad's - makes a new ad....

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor

Hi Key_West_Expres,

 

I can see where you're coming from.  I think it's just a function of being able to determine a simple change (unlikely to alter the performance of an ad), like a spelling error in an ad vs. a significant change.  Currently, there are no options for this. 

 

I know sometimes, I make small and simple changes to my ads and I prefer to see how it is performing in its new state as a stand alone ad vs. the original version. After all if I'm making changes to ads, chances are that I'm unhappy with the existing ad or feel that a change will help performance.

 

From a tracking perspective, it makes sense to treat every ad separately, if an ad is edited, regardless of the change, the potential is there for a completly different performance and in all rights should not be tied statistically to another ad variation. 

 

My couple cents...

 

-Tom

 

 

Tommy Sands, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’

Re: Editing ad's - makes a new ad....

Top Contributor
# 7
Top Contributor

Hi Key_West_Expres, an interesting discussion.

 

Personally, I think it makes sense to create a new ad for each edit.  Why?  Even a single character change can alter the entire context/meaning of an ad so they all have to be reviewed and Google (and you) need to be able to differentiate between one ad and a previous one.  Yes, you could say this is "AD #1, revision 6" and track it that way, but Google would still need to reset the data and history since, as I've said, a single character can completely change an ad.  Tracking revisions in this way would be far more complex than just having new ads.  From a data point of view, each revision would have to be uniquely identifiable, so there'd really be very little difference between a "revised" ad and a new one.  You couldn't retain the old data and performance because it's a different ad, it would make no sense.

 

Perhaps more importantly, this is a good example of why you should always have multiple ad variations in each group, and think carefully about how - and when - you edit.  When I edit ads, I do just one, or two, at a time in each group, leaving the others to carry on.  This means even if the CTR drops for these "new" ads, I haven't completely lost the overall performance of the group.  The more variations you have and the fewer you edit, the less the impact.

 

I do agree it's not perfect.  I'd like to be able to see a graph/data stream showing the changes I've made to an ad and the change in performance those changes effected.  The problem here is the "broom" idea.  At what point does a revised ad become "totally" new and not just an edit?  10 characters?  30?  If I change just one character, it'd be nice to be able to see that change plotted on a graph ("You changed this here and the peformance changed").  But if I change most of the ad, there'd be little point comparing it to its previous incarnation and - which is the thrust of my argument - a change that makes comparison pointless need not be a lot of characters, it could be just one.

 

To be honest I think this is an interesting discussion point and I'd love to see some feedback from a Googler on the thinking.

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

Re: Editing ad's - makes a new ad....

Top Contributor
# 8
Top Contributor

Sorry, I've just realised I didn't explain what the "broom idea" was.

 

There's an old joke in the UK (and I'm sure other countries) where a man says he's "had this same broom for 20 years, and all it's needed is two new handles and three new heads.".

 

J

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

Re: Editing ad's - makes a new ad....

Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆
# 9
Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆

As Jon mentioned even a minute edit can change the context of an ad, but also the way the ad can be displayed in the results.

 

If you have an ad that ranked high enough to appear above the results, just adding a full stop to the end of description line 1  can make it appear alongside the headline at the top of the ad which can have huge effects on CTR.

 

Changing from lower case to CAPS can also have big CTR effects.

Re: Editing ad's - makes a new ad....

Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
# 10
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Cobnut.  I completely agree with you that making a change, little or small, may or may not make how an ad is read, may change the effectiveness of that ad.

 

But, shouldn't I / we make the determination if the ad should be treated as a new one and fresh stats collected? 

 

I understand and appreciate that G has to review every ad, to assure that it meets guidelines, but after that point, isn't it still MY ad, that I'm paying for???