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Dumb question. If I use a term like "combustible dust" do I need to add additional word variations?

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# 1
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For example, do I need "combustible dust explosion", "combustible dust explosions", etc.?

2 Expert replyverified_user

Re: Dumb question. If I use a term like "combustible dust" do I need to add additional wo

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hello Fauske;

 

The broad match modifier (BMM) will give you all variants (plurals +ing forms.) :

+combustible +dust +explosion

 

However, (from my engineering background) these are niche words - I would keep them in the original broad match.

 

Read more:


AdWords Keyword MatchTypes

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Re: Dumb question. If I use a term like "combustible dust" do I need to add additional wo

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hi Fauske,

 

There are no dumb questions when it comes to AdWords!

 

After reading Moshe's post, I Googled "combustible dust explosion". There is one ad on the results page, in the top position. The keyword does represent a niche market, but apparently there is enough of a market to generate a reasonable click thru.

 

Yes, BMM will cover the variations for you, but you may find that certain variations perform better than others. In that case it is useful to also bid on the variations so you can adjust your bids accordingly. You may find certain variations do not perform well. Those you wil want to add as negatives. The system will pick the closest match to the search query for you.

 

Summary: You don't need to add additional variations, but it might be useful.

 

Best of Luck!

 

Pete

 

petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords