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Display Network Ad Auction

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# 1
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Hello everyone,

 

Can someone help me out. I am trying to get my head around the Google Display Network Auction. 

 

I have read the information on the Google Support site, and these are the three statements I can't seem to get my head around.  

 

  • You'll pay what's required to rank higher than the next best ad position only for incremental clicks you get from being in the current position.
  • You'll pay the price you would have for the next best ad position for the rest of the clicks.
  • You may pay an additional service fee for interest category ads on the Display Network. In such cases, your maximum bid is reduced before the auction and the fee is added to the closing auction price.

 If someone would be able to explain each one for me I would be very grateful!

 

Thanks in advance :-) 

1 Expert replyverified_user

Re: Display Network Ad Auction

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

@Jordan ;

The ad auction on the display is a bit more complex than the one on search because each position can have more than one ad unit (they're big banners and small banners. The big one compose of several ad units). Further, an advertiser  can win more than one ad position. (While in search an advertiser can win  only on ad position).The answer to your question lies in the detailed explanation in the link below. I agree that it takes a while to understand. You need a quiet place  and about an hour to follow the example  and the explanation.

https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2996564?hl=en

 

 

 

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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