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Difference: "walking with poles" vs "walking with poles"

[ Edited ]
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi there,

Just been told that the "+" sign between search terms is a better option; people who look for "walking in new york" would potentially see my ad on the keyword "walking with poles".
Whereas "walking+with+poles" ads are only shown when people actually search for "walking with poles".
Is this correct?
Thank you very much.

1 Expert replyverified_user
Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by topic author Patrick B
October 2016

Re: Difference: "walking with poles" vs "walking with poles"

Badged Google Partner
# 2
Badged Google Partner

Hello @Patrick B

That's not correct.

Kindly look into the below image.

This will help you to understand keyword match types more easily.

Capture.PNG

 

Thanks,

Manikandan G.

 

Re: Difference: "walking with poles" vs "walking with poles"

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hello, Patrick.

 

Manikandan's image explains how keyword match types work very well. Quotation marks around a group of words denote the phrase match. Which means that "walking with poles" will only trigger ads for search terms that contain the whole phrase (walking with poles). So the search term may be walking with poles in New York and it will still trigger your ads.

 

If you want to use the broad match modifier (i.e. have a broad match keyword and a "modifier", the "+" sign) you should ditch the quotation marks and have a keyword such as +walking with poles. This keyword will match all search queries containing the term walking (or close variations but not synonyms) but not necessarily with and poles. So, indeed, it may trigger ads for queries such as walking in New York.

 

However, if you include "walking+with+poles" as your keyword, the system will treat it as "phrase match" and will replace the + signs inside the keyword with spaces, thus treating it as if it were "walking with poles". And it will not trigger ads for walking in New York.

 

If, however, your keyword is walking+with+poles, without quotation marks, the system might treat it (i have neither tested nor read any materials about this) in the following ways:

- as modified broad match, by considering it to be the equivalent of walking +with +poles 

- as broad match, by replacing the + sign between the words with a space and treating the keyword as walking with poles, in broad match.

 

Hope I've managed to shed some light on this subject (keyword match types), one with a huge importance in AdWords advertising.

Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
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Difference: "walking with poles" vs "walking with poles"

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Thank you very much!

 

Difference: "walking with poles" vs "walking with poles"

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Thank you very much!

Difference: "walking with poles" vs "walking with poles"

[ Edited ]
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 6
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭

If you are using modified broad match, the + sign simply tells Google "this word must be included in the search term". It is best to proceed the + sign with a space, otherwise Google may parse your keyword incorrectly, interpreting the + sign as superfluous punctuation.  Google often throws out punctuation and considers it a space.  So the best practice would be to use:   +walking +with +poles.  But you might decide to experiment with +walking with +poles, to see what search terms match to it, and thereby discover new phrase/exact match keywords (per below).

 

As has been pointed out, broad match is best used only in rare circumstances, because it allows Google too broad of latitude to match against unrelated search terms.  There are only certain limited circumstances where broad match makes sense. But modified broad match is a very useful match type, especially early in a campaign's life cycle per below.

Use your search term report to observe what search terms are matching up to your "modified broad match" keywords over time.  You will likely quickly decide to add phrase match and exact match versions and variations, which are more targeted so they will be more economically efficient over the long term.  

 

In my experience, modified broad match is best used as a "discovery mechanism" to find more focused phrase and exact match keywords. 

 

Difference: "walking with poles" vs "walking with poles"

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 7
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Thank you very much - does it make sense to use the same keyword once as an exact match and once as a phrase match? Really the phrase match would include the exact match, making the exact match redundant. 

 

Difference: "walking with poles" vs "walking with poles"

Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 8
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭

It makes sense to use the exact match, it isn't really redundant.  It means the search term was EXACTLY that, and nothing else.  So it is a tighter, and more rare/qualified match than any phrase match.  Phrase match terms are intended to match to phrases that are preceded or followed by other words.

 

Difference: "walking with poles" vs "walking with poles"

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 9
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I'm learning a great deal albeit having used Adwords for several years.

Essentially one should use broad match and phrase match to find out the "best", most searched keywords and eventually have them listed as exact matches. Correct?

Difference: "walking with poles" vs "walking with poles"

Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 10
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭

Often both phrase and exact match have long-term application in a campaign.  For example, let's say you are advertising "golden retriever puppy breeder" in the state of California.  The exact match is likely to become a workhorse keyword.  However, many people will add words before (inexpensive) and after (city name, near me) and you may never find all the phrase match variations to run as exact match, or may not need to.  So both are applicable in many situations. In other situations, phrase match is still too loose, or perhaps there is enough volume just to use exact match.