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Compound keywords

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# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi all and thanks in advance.  I understand about broad, phrase, exact, and negative keywords.  Can hybrids of these types be included in a single keyword entry?  Such as the following:

 

"landscape contractor" San Diego

 

In this example, landscape and contractor are required as a phrase, while the words San and Diego are not required, but if entered would presumably show in bold in an ad presentation which could help draw attention.  (The business is is San Diego")

 

Also, can negative keywords be incorporated in a single keyword slot, instead of in the special negative keyword section? Such as:

 

pool service -table

 

for a swimming pool company, wishing to avoid searches on pool table service.

 

Is there an adwords page describing hybrid keyword entries of this nature?

 

Thanks!

2 Expert replyverified_user
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Accepted by RachelM (Google Employee)
September 2015

Re: Compound keywords

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi California_Tom,

 

I think you are touching on a number of things here so I'll do my best to address them all.

 

There are not official hybrids of match types, they all function differently.

 

Personally, I've never used external terms outside of phrase match keywords so I cannot confirm that this is possible, although it would appear so here, but I can say that the idea behind phrase is to capture those external terms for you.  If you know you want to include San Diego, I would suggest that you employ and exact match or include all of the terms within the phrase match. [landscape contractor San Diego] or "landscape contractor San Diego".  I think it's also worth noting that your location targeting settings will take into account that you are serving ads in San Diego and Adwords does recognize the search intent of users to show relevant ads when geo-modifiers are used, you will not need to specify city/towns in all of your keywords, although this is highly debated and often recommended to try them out and make your own determinations based on performance.

 

On a broader scale, you could use +landscape +contractor San Diego, (broad match modifier) which would requite the +terms in any order and the additional terms are not required.

 

Here are couple of articles about match types:

 

Keyword Match Types for Search Campaigns
Understanding, Evaluating and Managing AdWords Keyword Match Types

Keyword matching options


 

Bolding of terms within in ad is due to the relationship between the ad text and the search query.  You can however use location extensions to accomplish this.

 

Negative keywords can be added at the Campaign or Ad Group level and cannot be inserted with positive keywords.

 

If your business is swimming pools, I would think that you would want to exclude -table for every single query and would suggest that you add this term at the campaign level.  This would save you the work of adding negatives to each keyword as well.

 

I hope I have covered all of your questions here, please follow up if you would like any further clarification.

 

Hope this helps!

 

-Tom

 

 

Tommy Sands, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by RachelM (Google Employee)
September 2015

Re: Compound keywords

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi California_Tom,

 

I think you are touching on a number of things here so I'll do my best to address them all.

 

There are not official hybrids of match types, they all function differently.

 

Personally, I've never used external terms outside of phrase match keywords so I cannot confirm that this is possible, although it would appear so here, but I can say that the idea behind phrase is to capture those external terms for you.  If you know you want to include San Diego, I would suggest that you employ and exact match or include all of the terms within the phrase match. [landscape contractor San Diego] or "landscape contractor San Diego".  I think it's also worth noting that your location targeting settings will take into account that you are serving ads in San Diego and Adwords does recognize the search intent of users to show relevant ads when geo-modifiers are used, you will not need to specify city/towns in all of your keywords, although this is highly debated and often recommended to try them out and make your own determinations based on performance.

 

On a broader scale, you could use +landscape +contractor San Diego, (broad match modifier) which would requite the +terms in any order and the additional terms are not required.

 

Here are couple of articles about match types:

 

Keyword Match Types for Search Campaigns
Understanding, Evaluating and Managing AdWords Keyword Match Types

Keyword matching options


 

Bolding of terms within in ad is due to the relationship between the ad text and the search query.  You can however use location extensions to accomplish this.

 

Negative keywords can be added at the Campaign or Ad Group level and cannot be inserted with positive keywords.

 

If your business is swimming pools, I would think that you would want to exclude -table for every single query and would suggest that you add this term at the campaign level.  This would save you the work of adding negatives to each keyword as well.

 

I hope I have covered all of your questions here, please follow up if you would like any further clarification.

 

Hope this helps!

 

-Tom

 

 

Tommy Sands, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’

Re: Compound keywords

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hi California_Tom,

 

I'll answer your question with unequivacal "No, you can't do that".

 

What I suggest is that you use geo-targeting to target only the area you serve, like San Diego. Then you can either include "search intent" or not. "Search intent" will recognize geographic descriptors of areas within you target area as part of the query. You won't need to include San Diego in your phrase or exact match to trigger your ad.

 

I hope this makes sense!

 

Best of Luck!

 

Pete

 

petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords