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Cancelling our company's AdWords Acct

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# 1
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We have spent $30,000 on Adwords advertising and it appears that every time we try to change our ads, they are disapproved. Maybe Google should just write the ads for us. Is there really something inherently wrong with these ads? Did we use one too many exclamation points for the editors? Really?

 

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Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: Cancelling our company's AdWords Acct

Top Contributor
# 2
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Hello mlauterbach,

 

You are correct with regards to the second ad variation having too many exclamation marks but I can't see what is wrong with the first ad variation at the moment...


ScottyD, AdWords Top Contributor
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Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: Cancelling our company's AdWords Acct

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hello mlauterbach,

 

You are correct with regards to the second ad variation having too many exclamation marks but I can't see what is wrong with the first ad variation at the moment...


ScottyD, AdWords Top Contributor
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Re: Cancelling our company's AdWords Acct

Top Contributor
# 3
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It could be a case of this:


Google doesn't allow ad text that contains superlatives such as "best" or "#1" (and all other variations of the number 1), unless there's verification by a third party clearly displayed on the ad's website. Third-party verification must come from someone or some group unrelated to the site. Customer testimonials don't qualify as third-party verification.


http://support.google.com/adwordspolicy/bin/static.py?hl=en&topic=1310871&guide=1308149&page=guide.c...

 

Try (if you're still interested) "very good", or "great" instead of lowest, in the first ad, as the second, as Scott correctly pointed out, has one exclamation mark too many.

Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
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Re: Cancelling our company's AdWords Acct

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# 4
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Like I mentioned, we should just let Google write the ads. Our service is free to consumers and allows them to "find the lowest rates" based on how many insurance quotes they request, therefore the term should be allowed, but we're not going to go through an extensive process to have a third party verification of such verbiage. 

 

I feel offended by the word "the" so maybe Google should eliminate it from it's ads. How far in the direction of political correctness are we going to go? I'm sorry we had one (note: not "1") too many exclamation points...

 

Just frustrated with the whole thing and pulling the plug.

Re: Cancelling our company's AdWords Acct

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 5
Top Contributor

Hi mlauterbach, sorry you're disappointed with the system, but these rules are there for a reason.

 

If Google were to allow superlatives without confirmation, any company would be able to claim they were the "best", etc. without any form of guarantee of such.  This would mean web users would be being mislead, which is entirely against Google's intention with Adwords.  As for exclamation marks and other characters, again, these rules are there to ensure that ads are appropriate and well formed, not just "BUY NOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!".

 

As you may know, there are rules governing all forms of advertising with superlatives (certainly in the UK). For example, Carlsberg lager have the well-known tagline "Probably the best lager in the world", the "probably" being required to avoid a claim that they were definitively the best (which in my opinion, it certainly isn't).  Carlsberg have actually turned this phrase into a marketing key, so it's not all bad.

 

Have you asked for a review of the ad?  If it is the "lowest" word (which we're not sure it is, of course) then it may have been caught by an automated process.  A review by a human being may well see the ad approved.

 

It's not really that extensive a process is it?  Remove one exclamation mark and change the "lowest" lines to something like "Search for great deals" and you're done.

 

Adwords really isn't a "set and forget" application.  It does take time, experimentation and monitoring to get the best performance - just like any other form of advertising - and if you're unable to devote this time, perhaps Adwords isn't for you.

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

Re: Cancelling our company's AdWords Acct

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# 6
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It really appears to me (and others) that Google has acquired such a large share of the online advertising market that they have become abusive of their position.  As I am opposed to government intervention in the marketplace, except for extreme circumstances, I would advise anyone to start using alternative outlets.  As competing entities achieve market-share parity, perhaps Google will become more customer-friendly and less parental.