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Can someone explain why I would bid on these two broad keywords?

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# 1
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hi All

I've been doing adwords for about 2 years now.. and i just realize, i don't know the answer to these questions

Suppose I sell red fluffy shoes...  and I have two keywords

 

red fluffy shoes

buy red fluffy shoes

 

(both broad).

 

Now...

 

1) If a query came in with "fluffy shoes", which keyword gets triggered? Is it the one with higher ad rank? (i.e. function of QS & bid)

 

2) Why on earth would i bid on "buy red fluffy shoes" (broad) if "red fluffy shoes" already matches all possibilities?

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Accepted by Britta (Community Manager)
September 2015

This is why we have alternative match types

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# 2
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Hi Taewoo,

 

Question #1 - Yes the higher Ad Rank would be the Keyword that would be eligible for the impression.

 

Question #2 - This is why there are alternative match types.  Generally speaking, if you use a phrase match, say "fluffy shoes", you'll not only cover the near matches (buy fluffy shoes, red fluffy shoes etc..) but chances are that over time this would prove to earn a higher QS as you would be more relevant than just using broad match and would ideally get more relevant clicks.  I personally would not bid on both of those keywords as broad match.  Modified broad would even be a better option than to bid on both as broad match.

 

My 2 cents

 

-Tom

Tommy Sands, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
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Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Britta (Community Manager)
September 2015

This is why we have alternative match types

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi Taewoo,

 

Question #1 - Yes the higher Ad Rank would be the Keyword that would be eligible for the impression.

 

Question #2 - This is why there are alternative match types.  Generally speaking, if you use a phrase match, say "fluffy shoes", you'll not only cover the near matches (buy fluffy shoes, red fluffy shoes etc..) but chances are that over time this would prove to earn a higher QS as you would be more relevant than just using broad match and would ideally get more relevant clicks.  I personally would not bid on both of those keywords as broad match.  Modified broad would even be a better option than to bid on both as broad match.

 

My 2 cents

 

-Tom

Tommy Sands, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’

Hello Taewoo,   Good Morning!   Agree with Tom correctly,...

[ Edited ]
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# 3
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Hello Taewoo,

 

Good Morning!

 

Agree with Tom, only broad match keywords always brings in so many irrlevant queries.

 

I have one alternative solutions if you do not want to try other match types:

 

You can create two seperate adgroups. One for general Red fluffy shoes & another for Buy fluffy shoes. And try adgroup level negative kewords.

 

For buy red fluffy shoes

 

insert exact negative: [red fluffy shoes] as a negative.

 

For red fluffy shoes:

 

insert broad negative keywords: buy as a negative.

 

Hope it makes some sense.

 

Thanks,

Neha

 

Neha Gupta, AdWordsTop Contributor Follow Me: My Blog | Twitter | Google+ | LinkedIn
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Hello.   One less known aspect of keyword performance is...

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# 4
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Hello.

 

One less known aspect of keyword performance is the relationship between its performance in your account, versus its overall performance in all accounts using it.

 

Whenever you start using a new keyword, its initial quality score takes into account its historical performance across all others accounts using is.

 

In order to have the system weigh YOUR performance for that keyword, you need about 1000 exact impressions for that keyword. That's roughly the threshold when the AdWords system weighs your CTR, and not the historical CTR for that keyword.

 

Now, if you go too broad, and use, for instance +fluffy +shoes as your keyword, the QS for that keyword will be your own only after 1000 impressions for exactly fluffy shoes. Not red fluffy shoes, not buy red fluffy shoes.

 

And if the historical performance of fluffy shoes is not great, and if people search for fluffy shoes something more often than they search for fluffy shoes alone, you're stuck with that bad performance for longer than you'd wish.

 

Yes, broader nets are nice, because they give you more fish as a whole. But if someone ordered sea bass, and that's what you get your money for, coming ashore with five tons of tuna will not take care of that particular customer.

 

That's why every search term which comes along often enough, and is considered relevant, should be transformed into a keyword, with exact and sometimes phrase match. Either in the ad group responsible for it, or in a newer, even more relevant one.

 

This is also how you can 'heal' a damaged keyword (Kim has an article about it on her blog). You can, in time, raise the QS of a damaged (historically) keyword, and make it better in your account, if you can place it in a highly relevant ad group, with ads which get clicked often. If you can write good ads, and people click on them, and your CTR is much higher than what others managed to achieve, you should see the QS rise after these approximately 1000 precise match impressions.

 

Now if I could only find that article detailing the 1000 precise/exact match impressions. @Lakatos, do you happen to have the link handy? I think it's also in Craig's book, but only have that on paper.

Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
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Regarding #2, those keywords represent very different und...

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# 5
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Regarding #2, those keywords represent very different underlying search queries. Wouldn't you want to bid more for a search that is more likely to result in a sale?